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  1. #1
    jbl
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    negs seem a bit pink

    Hi,

    I just tried my first roll of C-41. I've done B&W for a few years, but this is my first foray into color.

    I shot a test roll of Ektar 100 out in front of my house and developed it in the Rollei Kit. The roll is still drying, but the negatives look pinker than what I've gotten from the lab.

    The instructions with the chemicals say that a magenta cast with higher density near the sprocket holes means the developer was too warm or the agitation was too much. I think I'm seeing a magenta cast, but the density of the negatives is consistent. If anything, they look a little thin, but it's hard to tell for sure because they're hanging in my shower.

    Does it sound like I over agitated or had the developer too warm?

    Thanks,

    Jonathan

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    Have you used this film before? Not all color negative films look the same.

    I am not familiar with the Rollei kit. Does it use a stop bath after the developer and before the bleach. I have found that the developing agent left in the emulsion will cause a magenta stain when exposed to the bleach. An acid stop bath will help remove most of it and reduce any magenta cast.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 08-08-2011 at 02:03 AM. Click to view previous post history.
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    jbl
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    Sorry, I should have been clearer on that. I was comparing it to a roll of Ektar I got back from a lab recently, so it's the same.

    I'm guessing I can easily correct for this when I scan (I know....), but I was concerned I was doing something wrong.

    -jbl

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    A lab may not use standard C-41 chemistry other than the developer.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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    jbl
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    It does not use a stop before the bleach, though people seem to say that's ok in this kit, but recommend adding a wash step before and after fixing. I did add the washes.

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    jbl
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    Sounding like maybe I didn't mess it up . I guess if the images look good, it hardly marters. Still, a little amazed this was that straightforward.

    Jonathan

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    Maybe when they dry they will be different.

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    C41 looks very strange and milky when it's wet. Don't bother looking at it until it's dry.

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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    C41 looks very strange and milky when it's wet. Don't bother looking at it until it's dry.
    You may be thinking of the older C-22 films which were very hard to evaluate until they were dry. In C-22 emulsions the dye couplers were contained in microscopic resin beads. This prevented the couplers from migrating during development. Agfa used a different system where the couplers had long side chains to prevent migration. Sort of like a boat dragging an anchor. When exposed to water the beads become opaque. With C-41 films Kodak adopted the Agfa method which does not have the milkiness problem.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 08-08-2011 at 03:06 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    You may be thinking of the older C-22 films which were very hard to evaluate until they were dry. In C-22 emulsions the dye couplers were contained in microscopic resin beads. This prevented the couplers from migrating during development. Agfa used a different system where the couplers had long side chains to prevent migration. Sort of like a boat dragging an anchor. When exposed to water the beads become opaque. With C-41 films Kodak adopted the Agfa method which does not have the milkiness problem.
    No, I'm talking about C-41, which I develop at home. I've never seen a C-22 film, let alone wet.

    If you're used to B&W, a wet C-41 film looks a bit underfixed. Some moreso than others.

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