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  1. #1

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    Color printing filter settings - chart or software available?

    Hi All,

    I just started printing color. I am using an Omega dichroic head with substractive filtering, printing on to Fuji Crystal Archive (Type II) and developing in drums.

    Is there any chart or software available for initial filter settings?

    Thanks -

    Tony

  2. #2

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    Nope. Just your eyes.

  3. #3
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Start with 50Y 30M and get the density right first then start adjusting your colour. There are so many different filter packs and they depend on type
    of film, lighting conditions, where it was processed, and so on.

    have fun

  4. #4
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    What I use when I get a new negative is a shot of someone holding a gray card exposed by flash, or truly 5500K light (checked with a meter). Then balancing goes very quickly using a set of viewing filters. The worst way to do it is with any sort of shot taken under unknown lighting.

    Each film will have different base filtration. Keep a chart of film and paper combos. Also, standardizing on just one, or at most a few films, will make your like much easier.

    Post what films you are using and maybe someone with the same enlarger can post their starting values for that paper.

  5. #5

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    There is a helpful kodak color printing chart that helps to explain filtration while printing (hard to find), but there isnt anything that will give you the filter pack for any specific film. There are just too many variables as mentioned above- processing, lighting conditions, et all variable.

    Here is a helpful PDF that I found which could help with difficulties- http://www.earthscenics.com/manuals/...an_8_11_05.pdf

    All the best-
    M. David Farrell, Jr.

    ----------------------------------------------
    ~Buying a Nikon doesn not make you a photographer. It makes you a Nikon owner!

    ~Everybody has a photographic memory, but not everybody has film!

  6. #6

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    Thanks all. I appreciate it. I was lucky enough to get an Omega color analyzer. So, along with this and my viewing filters, I think I'm getting somewhere. It just drives me nuts when I get into that mode where my eyes are burned out. After the dry down, sometimes I'll catch a "whiff" of magenta in a print or cyan/green.

    Experience is the only solution I guess . . . .

    Tony

  7. #7

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    Color correction for neutral is difficult at first. It really takes going through a ton of paper to get it right. A few more tips...

    Your color reader won't help you but your kodak viewing filters will if you use them correctly.

    Having a print viewing wall where you can tack or tape your test strips is a must. Write your color pack #'s on the test strips so you can see your progress as you move towards neutral.

    By hand developing you're introducing many more variables than necessary. Oftentimes the difference between a neutral print and a biased print is a matter of a half point or less on your omega filter dial. A slight change in chemistry temperature, agitation, activity (accurate replenishment) or time could render these subtle color pack adjustments useless and drive you nuts in the process. For this reason I think it worthwhile to invest in a small roller transport machine. The fujimoto cp31 (up to 11" wide) or the cp51 are remarkably stable thereby capable of producing the kind of consistency in processing that you'll need to get into the finer aspects of color control. There's a super clean cp31 with a wash dry module and a replenishment module on ebay right now (no affiliation etc.) for $300 - dry to dry, totally worth it! It's local pickup only but perhaps you could convince the seller to drop it off at a mailbox etc. and have a third party pack it up for you. Each bath takes just 1800 ml. of chem, small footprint, runs on 110v. awesome electronics and just really simple to use - perfect for the home user.

  8. #8
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by frotog View Post
    The fujimoto cp31 (up to 11" wide) or the cp51 are remarkably stable thereby capable of producing the kind of consistency in processing that you'll need to get into the finer aspects of color control.

    .... awesome electronics and just really simple to use - perfect for the home user.
    I am a happy CP-31 with w/d owner, and love it, but I have some disagreement with the last line.

    The machines are getting older. Some level of mechanical and electrocal fidddling is needed to keep them ticking properly as tiem marches on.

    I can identify with the original poster about the teething pains one goes thought when first training yourself and your colur perception to become proficient at printing with the RA-4 process materials.
    my real name, imagine that.

  9. #9

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    All depends on how the machine has been kept. I've heard of some second hand machines that need considerable scrubbing and general maintenance before they can even begin to perform as intended. It's not uncommon for these machines to acquire electrical problems due to their compromised mechanical condition. On the other hand, I've never encountered any problems with either my cp51 or cp32 other than having to replace drive gears and a few pincher rollers - that and semi annual deep cleaning I consider routine maintenance. Mine get a lot of use and have proved themselves extremely robust but then I received them in clean condition. Either way, it sure beats trying to accomplish critical color correction with trays and extended dry-down times.



 

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