Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,938   Posts: 1,557,355   Online: 1187
      
Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 75
  1. #11
    brian steinberger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    2,334
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    100
    Mike, excellent examples! Thanks so much. I especially enjoy the gas pump. That's the style I like to shoot.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    156
    Ektar will pump up the reds which does not generally flatter people.
    So Portra is the best for Portra-its. (duhh)

  3. #13
    mikecnichols's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Marion, VA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    345
    Images
    38
    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    Mike, excellent examples! Thanks so much. I especially enjoy the gas pump. That's the style I like to shoot.
    I'm glad they helped. The gas pump is my favorite Ektar shot I've done so far...I'm looking forward to the fall colors and doing a family portrait amongst the trees.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Monterey Co, CA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    303
    I've been shooting Ektar and older versions of Portra in MF and would say that the color balance is different. Ektar is really superb for vegetation and scenery... (sort of like Kodachrome 25 of old), and Portra is a wonderful skin tone reproducing film (like Supra or Kodacolor of old). Both now have very fine grain but I got more much more excited about Ektar availability in 120 a couple of years back due to the it's better scanability at high resolutions needed from smaller formats like 35mm and 645.
    So long as you're into experimenting with these films you might also want to try adding to the mix some Fujicolor Pro 160S (or whatever it is they're calling it now). I find it has extremely nice neutrals and super fine grain much like Ektar and the long dynamic range of Portra. (Subdued contrast is not always ideal for punchy sunsets, however).

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,683
    Right on the Kodak website there are comparison charts between Ektar and the various Portras, both
    previous and current. It has about the same contrast as the now discontinued 160VC, but is slightly
    more saturated. Due to the level of saturation, it will seemingly exaggerate skin blemishes etc. But
    this is only in comparison to traditonal negative films, which are deliberately toned-down for pleasing
    skintone effect. It is NOT as contrasty as any transparency film; and it can reproduce a wide range of
    hue quite faithfully, IF you expose it at the proper color temperature. I've mentioned this on a variety
    of threads. If you don't properly filter for color balance, if things are too far out of whack, no amount
    of fussing around in PS is going to give you an ideal negative. All three color layers have to be correctly exposed in relation to one another to begin with. This is also true of Portra and other color
    neg films. But as the saturation curve goes up, so does the accentuation of any potential errors.

  6. #16
    brian steinberger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    2,334
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    100
    Quote Originally Posted by Pupfish View Post
    So long as you're into experimenting with these films you might also want to try adding to the mix some Fujicolor Pro 160S (or whatever it is they're calling it now). I find it has extremely nice neutrals and super fine grain much like Ektar and the long dynamic range of Portra. (Subdued contrast is not always ideal for punchy sunsets, however).
    I can't find Fuji 160S anymore. The only color negative films I can currently find are 400H and Reala.

  7. #17
    Athiril's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,603
    Images
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by stavrosk View Post
    Ektar will pump up the reds which does not generally flatter people.
    So Portra is the best for Portra-its. (duhh)
    Learn to colour balance. Skin tones have huge separation from reds on Ektar.

  8. #18
    brucemuir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Metro DC area, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,264
    Images
    4
    ^
    I hope that pilot aint stoned lol
    j/k

  9. #19
    Athiril's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,603
    Images
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by brucemuir View Post
    ^
    I hope that pilot aint stoned lol
    j/k
    Nah, he was the front passenger. I was in the back in a harness with the door off.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,021
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    Right on the Kodak website there are comparison charts between Ektar and the various Portras, both
    previous and current. It has about the same contrast as the now discontinued 160VC, but is slightly
    more saturated. Due to the level of saturation, it will seemingly exaggerate skin blemishes etc. But
    this is only in comparison to traditonal negative films, which are deliberately toned-down for pleasing
    skintone effect. It is NOT as contrasty as any transparency film; and it can reproduce a wide range of
    hue quite faithfully, IF you expose it at the proper color temperature. I've mentioned this on a variety
    of threads. If you don't properly filter for color balance, if things are too far out of whack, no amount
    of fussing around in PS is going to give you an ideal negative. All three color layers have to be correctly exposed in relation to one another to begin with. This is also true of Portra and other color
    neg films. But as the saturation curve goes up, so does the accentuation of any potential errors.
    Emphasis added because this is very important with any contrasty and saturated material. The same characteristics that give it that special look also give you less room for slop than some other films. Proper exposure of all the color layers is very important with this film. That means you will have the easiest time printing if you filter it:

    - any time it is cloudy
    - any time it is overcast
    - any time your subject is primarily in the shade or in window light
    - any time it is more than a few hours either side of noon.
    - any time you shoot under artificial light that is not daylight balanced (i.e. most artificial light in our day-to-day lives)

    Given what many people tend to shoot, this means that most people should filter this film a good deal of the time. The same is true of any color neg material, but especially important with this film due to the fact that it's contrast lowers it's latitude for imbalanced color.

    "Learn[ing] to color balance" only works if there is enough density on all three layers to do the balancing. If not, you can balance brighter areas, but the lower tones will appear "wonky," or vice versa. So if you cannot or will not filter, at least give yourself some extra exposure to allow more workability in color balancing.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 08-29-2011 at 02:59 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin