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  1. #11
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    Look at the C41 formula published here on APUG. It is nearly correct. Your pH is far too high. The correct pH is about 10.2 or thereabouts. The temperature is supposed to be 38.x degrees C (I forget the exact equivalence to 100F). So, there are so many things wrong with your process I hardly know what to suspect first. Try to replicate C41 exactly first and then make variations.

    PE

  2. #12

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    Yes ok, I have got some good results at 38,7.

    My Intention is to get my own negatives, with my own saturation and color density.

    I solved so much, by many many tries but get stuck at the magenta cast.

    But to understand why:

    My greenish negatives means, that the cyan dye layer and the magenta layer is not dense enough (caused by wrong developement)? So I get redish images? And I have to find a way to get a denser cyan layer?

    Or am I completely wrong?
    Last edited by Color Photographer; 09-10-2011 at 12:07 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13
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    The cyan is too dense or the magenta and yellow are not dense enough. I cannot tell without data. It sounds as if the cyan is too dense. This means too much development and too much fog.

    So, you need LESS cyan and maybe more magenta and yellow.

    PE

  4. #14

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    Thanks PE

    Ad If you understand you right, in another post: a lower temperature and lower agitation cause a denser yellow?
    You mean fog caused by development?

  5. #15
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    Lower temperature and lower agitation causes less CYAN or if you get the cyan up where it should be, it causes a denser YELLOW.

    Remember those qualifiers. They are important.

    PE

  6. #16

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    thanks again

    And because yellow is the first layer on the surface of the film, maybe I can find a way to change the diffusion of the developer to the deeper layers.

  7. #17
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    Good luck on that one. I gave up due to the cost in time, film and chemicals.

    PE

  8. #18
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    The free on-line (PDF) part 5 Using Kodak Flexicolor Chemical "5 Process monitoring and troubleshooting" (Z131_05) should help you diagnose most shifts as temp/pH/time vary from spec. for c41 chemistries. The response of each of 3 color layers is plotted in graphs starting at page 5-29. With them you can see the relationship that varying each parameter has on each color layer. Most useful in figuring what/where/howmuch you want to start modifying when working with "known" chemistry. If your working at weird temps, like 25C and non-standard chemsitry, you're kind of on your own to determine each effect. I suspect the information in the manual will still be somewhat useful. Don't have the link handy, but it's easy to find on-line.
    Robert

  9. #19

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    thanks!

    I hope I understand it right:

    If the charts speak about red, green, and blue they mean the colors in the print?
    Not t.E the layer on the negative that is sensitive for bue light?

    t.E. ist shows an increase of RED if using to much of Part A. This means the prints will become reddish?

  10. #20
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    Red = cyan
    Green = magenta
    Blue = yellow

    To measure the dye, you measure the "opposite" density. And, after this answer, I must say you need to do some reading real soon now.

    PE

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