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Thread: Slide sharpness

  1. #21
    Rudeofus's Avatar
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    Fuji Astia is a beautiful film, but it has been discontinued (35mm is hard to get by now) and you will be disappointed if you want high saturation. Velvia has a lot of compelling qualities for landscape shots as long as you do not include people in the shot. If you want to include people in the shot and still aim for high saturation, give Kodak E100VS a try.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  2. #22
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    "Sharpness" of slides is incorrect. Resolving power (interpreted through individual film RMS charts)is a more accurate descriptor. However, a lot depends on the quality of the lens you are using. A poor quality optic will not exactly do the clearest Velvia any favours.

    Velvia 100F is my choice for detail in the 100 range, otherwise RVP 50.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
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  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    "Sharpness" of slides is incorrect. Resolving power (interpreted through individual film RMS charts)is a more accurate descriptor. However, a lot depends on the quality of the lens you are using. A poor quality optic will not exactly do the clearest Velvia any favours.

    Velvia 100F is my choice for detail in the 100 range, otherwise RVP 50.



    Yes thank you. I was a little unsure if sharpness was the correct wording for the thread. However i'm finding it difficult to accept Velvia 100F into my shooting plans just yet,i like the fact the predicted archival life has improved greatly to other Fuji slide films. However 50 speed has this unique quailty which the other films seem to lack.

    I think it's time for a few more test shoot's and to stock up on various 100 speed films.

  4. #24
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    bishy, the palette characteristics of 100F are poles apart from the Darling of Disneychrome, RVP 50. The intensity of the primaries, and their clarity, is what sets 50 apart from 100F. The flashy, avant garden 100F has a peculiar palette (reds tend toward brown and greens look very flat while yellows can be rendered a bit like mustard!), which has long niggled long-time devotees of 50. It definitely has its use though in landscape (not during the day though when it can look just awful in bright sun) and I use it ahead of 50 for that purpose (morning, evening), but retain 50 as the prime 'gold standard'. You might want to take Provia 100 for a spin; it has less brutal contrast than the Velvias.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  5. #25
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    I can't see what the O.P's problem is, none of the current range of Fuji Professional slide films 50, 100,400 or 800 ISO are lacking in resolving power, contrast or apparent sharpness, indeed are probably the the best range of colour transparency film currently manufactured, if he likes the propertys of Velvia 50 and would like a 100 ISO film with the same propertys, Use Velvia 100F.
    Ben

  6. #26
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Ben;

    Your point is very valid. Fuji has concentrated on slide films and Kodak has concentrated on negative films. This is why one will probably go to Fuji or Kodak if they prefer slide or negative.

    PE

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Ben;

    Your point is very valid. Fuji has concentrated on slide films and Kodak has concentrated on negative films. This is why one will probably go to Fuji or Kodak if they prefer slide or negative.

    PE
    Thanks Ron, I agree with you Kodak Neg films are indeed excellent, but Fuji 160S and 400H and Reala are no slouch either
    Ben

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    I can't see what the O.P's problem is, none of the current range of Fuji Professional slide films 50, 100,400 or 800 ISO are lacking in resolving power, contrast or apparent sharpness, indeed are probably the the best range of colour transparency film currently manufactured, if he likes the propertys of Velvia 50 and would like a 100 ISO film with the same propertys, Use Velvia 100F.
    No problem at all. There has been some great advice given on this thread,and i have learn't a little more.

    I was well aware of the propeties of Velvia 100F. I did shoot through a large batch last year with mixed results.

  9. #29

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    The numbers do not tell it all. Film has many factors and even if a film is sharper it may not LOOK better.

    I did a simple test during the 18 months I had after Kodak announced Kodachrome was going away. I would have my camera loaded with Kodachrome 64 and when I shot slide #36 I would reload with the new film to be tested and shoot the same shot on slide #1. When I took shot #36 of the test roll I would load a new roll of Kodachrome and shoot the same shot on slide #1. I kept up this alternation for a year and a half. I kept shooting the stuff I usually do and so had a good samples of lighting, color, etc. Still it was not a complete test as I only shot about 60 rolls during that peroid. In the end I still feel that Kodachrome was the sharpest film but others films did very well in other aspects. It takes a while to get know a film and one test number or even one test roll will not do it. Shoot a few rolls over a period of time and see what happens.

  10. #30

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    Also one note to add to my last post. Several of the films (Fuji and Kodak) I tested were also cut from the production line in the last 2.5 years. In the future the sharpest slide film may be the only slide film. Kodak only has one slide film left E100G. There is E100VS and it seems sharper but I don't like it's colors for what I shoot. So for me there is only one left.

    PS I know they also market Elite Chrome 100 but is is really the same film as E100G.



 

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