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  1. #11
    VaryaV's Avatar
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    Thank you all for this very valuable information. It has really clarified some current issues I am dealing with.

    Sometimes, when you try new films and developers that are in complete opposition to your normal methodology it throws you for a loop.
    Sourdough, salami and blue cheese... and 2 dogs drooling with such sad, sad eyes. ... they're working me... they know I'll cave!

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  2. #12

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    You can move where I live and have more normal temps!

    Jeff

  3. #13
    VaryaV's Avatar
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    Tell me about it. I have to run the a/c and de-humidifier constantly in the summer and heat in the winter... would I have to move to San Diego to get year around consistency?
    Sourdough, salami and blue cheese... and 2 dogs drooling with such sad, sad eyes. ... they're working me... they know I'll cave!

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  4. #14
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    If you use TMax or TMax RS developer, Kodak gives times for various dilutions and temperatures, but suggests 75F/24C as a starting point. For certain combinations of films and dilutions they only give development times for 75F/24C.

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/j86/j86.pdf
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #15

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    We had discussed earlier room temperature as being important for Stand Development, so if your not doing Stand, then forget this. But if you are, then a few observations I've read while researching: Stand development depends upon having film stand in very dilute motionless developer for a long time. In theory, the developer will exhaust itself in the highlights and continue to work in on the shadows and midtones. If the developer is allowed to shift and move around, then the highlight areas will continue to get fresh developer, and will become blocked. If the developer is not the same temperature as the air outside the tank (room temperature), then it will necessarily adjust itself to BECOME room temperature, and this adjustment will cause currents and eddies in the tank and move the developer around. I can't cite the sources at this moment, but I've read that the temperature really isn't all that critical, but the stillness of the developer certainly is. I keep a few jugs of water in my darkroom all the time so that I always have "room temp" water available. In two months, when the Illinois winter begins to kick in, my darkroom will be 10-15 degrees (F) cooler than it is, and then I'll see just how "uncritical" the temperature really is.

  6. #16
    VaryaV's Avatar
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    So are your results for stand development the same regardless whether room temperature is 68 or 55? I know if you let it stand for 1 hour it may not be as critical as a 13, or 10 minute.... or will it still shift the curves?

    keep me posted.
    Sourdough, salami and blue cheese... and 2 dogs drooling with such sad, sad eyes. ... they're working me... they know I'll cave!

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  7. #17

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    I start with developer at 68F and room temp at 72-74 and use developing time as per mfg. unless I want more contrast. Keeping consistent as was mentioned is probably the best suggestion. If you are getting the results you want, why rock the boat?

    If someone is so inclined they could mix the volume of developer you use, cool or warm it to 68F use the time recommended and measure the temp at even intervals. Take the average and use the time for that temp. Then take two rolls at the same exposure setting. Develop one for the average and one at the time for 68F. Compare the negatives and see if it is really worth changing your routine.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  8. #18

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    For the classical Adox emulsions 20° C / 68F is the golden spot.
    Rodinal is very demanding, when it comes to those type of emulsion.
    Distilled water and also, filter Your fixer if not 1st timer.

  9. #19
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    I generally have a 20C room temp that works decent for all my chemistries

  10. #20

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    In my country, they stated 25C as the room temp, but in the summer the temp in room can reach 35C and in winter it can go down to 18-20C, so i adjust the temp of the chems to be at 20-22C all the time.

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