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  1. #1
    VaryaV's Avatar
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    Please define/clarify at 'room temperature'

    There seems to be some confusion on my part and I will explain below.

    This is in regards to me using Efke50/Adox50 in Rodinal. I was given tips by several people that this film needs temperatures that are consistent and 'at room temperature' and souped in distilled water..... ok. (here lies the problem):

    I have always thought and do develop all of my films at 68 degrees F. This means that I add hot water or ice cubes to adjust the temp. I live in FL where it gets very hot. In summer when it's 100+ degrees I keep my d/r (which is outside) at 68. When it's cooler at 80 the studio runs 72-76. and in winter it can be anywhere from 55 to 65 degrees.

    Last night I souped my first batch at 72 as that was the current 'room temperature.'

    Now... do you really mean 68 is room temperature?.... Always?... because I assume the warmer or colder temperatures then would have to be considered into either extending or shorten dev. times and I don't want to go there. and I don't think I can soup film in 55 degree water at the same time across the board as I would 72. I don't want to be constantly adjusting for times.

    Now, if I do my normal route of adding ice or hot water to equal 68 with these films will that be good enough? if my dev/stop/fixer are all at that 68?

    Thank you .... just wanting clarity because it is obvious chemical reactions change with temperatures.

    Any feedback would be welcome.
    Sourdough, salami and blue cheese... and 2 dogs drooling with such sad, sad eyes. ... they're working me... they know I'll cave!

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  2. #2
    SuzanneR's Avatar
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    I consider room temp to be between 67 and 73 degrees, but I think it's more important to be consistent than accurate. If it's easier to keep your temps closer to 72 degrees F, then use that as your room temp, but always use it.

  3. #3
    Rick A's Avatar
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    I always develope at "room temp", and adjust my time accordingly. If my chems happen to be 68f then I use the time for that, if 70f then I check the time/temp chart and use the time given. For years I only used 68f as my temp, but I find room temp as more convenient.
    Rick A
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    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  4. #4
    VaryaV's Avatar
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    When you do that, do you also reduce your development time by a 1/2 stop or full? or do you keep them the same as you would for 68 to make up the temperature difference?

    Sorry, this never was an issue until I starting testing different films.

    It's much easier to do at room temps 'if' I can keep the d/r steady. being as the building it outside it's much, much harder to control both the water and air. The water supply was put in after it was built so we were unable to run the lines underground.

    Sorry, Rick I just saw your post.
    Sourdough, salami and blue cheese... and 2 dogs drooling with such sad, sad eyes. ... they're working me... they know I'll cave!

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  5. #5
    X. Phot.
    Found These . . .
    http://unblinkingeye.com/Articles/De...s_rodinal.html

    http://unblinkingeye.com/Articles/De...al/Rodinal.pdf

    BTW: I'm not a Rodinal user. The chart below has given me satisfactory results when using D76.

    Temperature Compensation Chart
    http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/...0208211880.pdf

    Other stuff . .

    Film Processing Chart - ILFORD
    http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/2006216122447.pdf

    Film Processing Chart - KODAK
    http://www.kodak.com/global/plugins/...essChartLo.pdf
    Last edited by X. Phot.; 10-11-2011 at 10:54 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    I haven't tested myself but read right here that Rodinal gives even courser grain at higher temps.

  7. #7
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    When in the UK I process at 20C regardless of the room temperature, mainly because the water temperature never rises above that, and that's more important.

    In Turkey I always process at the tap water temperature in the summer which is a very constant 26-27C, however this is to high for EFKE films - 22c would be the maximum I'd use for them.

    As Suzanne says it's the consistency that's more important and that means keeping the whole process cycle so that there's never more than +/- 1C between stages including washing.

    Ian

  8. #8
    ROL
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    Room Temperature = 68F = 20C.

    Development times decrease with increasing temperature, and vice versa, within experimental ranges given by film manufacturers, as in the previous post. Most films standardize at 20C, around 10 minutes total developing time.

    Consistency is key. However, I'm never overly concerned with a degree variation with developer for panchromatic films, particularly over the relatively short course of time indicated, even if ambient temperatures are at somewhat greater variance. Though this condition to, may be mitigated without AC by choosing a time and environment to work in each day that is close to "room temperature".

  9. #9
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brucemuir View Post
    I haven't tested myself but read right here that Rodinal gives even courser grain at higher temps.
    That's not true at all, the developer temperature itself has no effect on the grain as long as the times's adjusted.

    However Rodinal contains Potassium Hydroxide which softens the emulsion and any variations in temperatures between stages - dev/stop/fixer/wash can cause micro reticulation (surface reticulation) which makses resulting prints/scans appear much coarser grained. This only happens with a few emulsions.

    Ian

  10. #10
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    That's not true at all, the developer temperature itself has no effect on the grain as long as the times's adjusted.

    However Rodinal contains Potassium Hydroxide which softens the emulsion and any variations in temperatures between stages - dev/stop/fixer/wash can cause micro reticulation (surface reticulation) which makses resulting prints/scans appear much coarser grained. This only happens with a few emulsions.

    Ian
    Yea, I was curious as to what caused this if only for my own understanding.
    I asked in the thread where it was stated but maybe my post got lost in the clutter.

    Like I said I haven't ran into the issue as I almost always run 68/20c and slightly warmer in summer.

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