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Thread: 60's color 120

  1. #31
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tycho View Post
    Ok, I just got a test roll back from Wallgreens (so straight autoscan I assume - testing out my newly bought Nikon FE for light leaks). I used Superia 400 from Walmarts but forgot to change the film speed, and had it set to 200. I over exposed a stop, sometimes 2. In direct sunlight I blew out skin tones, but in shade and overcast situations it gave a great vintage look. I was surprised by the result and shooting a second roll with the same settings, shooting at meter for direct sunlight this time.

    I'm new to film and not sure what I did here. Was it because I shot a 400 film at 200? Or just simply overexposing a stop or 2 / combination? I'd like to do this on purpose when I want to, why does the Fujifilm give this look?
    There are so many variables involved in your "workflow" that it is just about impossible to ascribe the results you obtained to any particular one.

    Assuming the Walgreens film development was of good quality (there is no absolute guarantee of this) it is most likely you could obtain a wide variety of results if you had someone with more knowledge and resources do your printing (optical) or scanning and printing (if hybrid) work.

    The over-exposure may very well contribute to the results you obtained, but only because the Walgreens people and equipment didn't handle it well.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #32
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by tycho View Post
    Ok, I just got a test roll back from Wallgreens (so straight autoscan I assume - testing out my newly bought Nikon FE for light leaks). I used Superia 400 from Walmarts but forgot to change the film speed, and had it set to 200. I over exposed a stop, sometimes 2. In direct sunlight I blew out skin tones, but in shade and overcast situations it gave a great vintage look. I was surprised by the result and shooting a second roll with the same settings, shooting at meter for direct sunlight this time.

    I'm new to film and not sure what I did here. Was it because I shot a 400 film at 200? Or just simply overexposing a stop or 2 / combination? I'd like to do this on purpose when I want to, why does the Fujifilm give this look?
    Like Matt said, this was really more a matter of dumb luck. If there is any certainty now, it's that Noritsu/Fuji minilabs will gin out utterly inconsistent results thanks to low maintenance, low volume and low skilled operators. Consistency usually results from experience with a given film, a good lab, and dialed-in lighting. It's easier to get this look with digital or hybrid workflow. Glad you're happy.

  3. #33

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    Thanks guys. I want to run a couple more rolls through the FE and pony up for a scanner after. I'll go hybrid at that point - even try my hand processing my own film.

    Apologies to the OP, didn't know it was 120 discussion.

  4. #34

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    Although Kodak Vericolor had a following, most fashion work in the 1960s was done using Type B transparency film with 3200K lighting. There are still a couple of Tungsten color transparency films around, although you might have a hard time finding the lights. A useful althernative would be a high speed daylight transparency film with strobes. What I think you are looking for is high contrast with moderate saturation.

  5. #35

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    @nworth

    Would x-proc of slide film do the trick to C-41, or is that too high(rich?) in saturation? Thanks, trying to learn as fast as I can.

  6. #36

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    The studio I worked with in the 70's used studio strobes with KR64 film. Sometimes we needed a filter for better skin tones so we would buy a bunch of film with the same emulsion number to test it before we commited it to paying jobs.
    Hasselblad with 150mm lens was a standard for our people pics. Sometines the 250mm lens or the 80mm was used. We rented a 50mm wide if we needed to. Good times. Nikon F, my boss used also, mostly with the 85mm F1.8.
    Nikon F100, D7000, 35mm F1.8G (DX), 85mm F1.8G, 50mm F1.8G.

  7. #37

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    Get a 100ft perforated bulk roll of konica 160 professional from ultrafine, roll your own, and shoot 35mm. Just a thought.

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