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  1. #71
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Ed;

    I have an Apple ][, a /// and an early Mac. I have 8" drives for the first two and a HD for the ///. I wrote my own software in Assembly and still have copies of the source code on disk and as printout. Almost everything I have on disk is my own creation. I used to write and sell Apple software, and teach courses at night in hardware and software applications. Most of that is now unusable and certainly out of date and that is the only relevant point here in this thread. All digital goes the way of the dinosaur and IMHO is so technically complex that it is too hard - nearly useless in most cases, to try and duplicate.

    Today's sound boards are so much more effective as are current graphics. Why import old Apple stuff. I have early Kodak digital photos that are quite nice but nearly useless. Same thing!

    PE

  2. #72

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    Nice score on the ///, those are somewhat rare (at least in working form). 8" drives seem like an odd choice for those unless you already had them at the time? I never wrote much in assembly if I could help it, it was just above my level @ the time. I did hack quite a bit of things using assembly though. ;-) What software did you sell back then? I was a huge apple ][ fanatic back in the day also, though I didnt' sell software, but I did write quite a bit which I just gave away (open source).

    I hear you re: old vs. new and whether it's worth the trouble. I sometimes like to look through my old source code from 30+ years ago and see what I was thinking at the time, as far as logic, and comments in the code, etc. Interesting, sometimes... almost like a journal in a way.

    I bet I could still pull stuff old 5.25" apple floppies if I had to, if the disks themselves were not self-corrupted or damaged. now, whether I would want or need to is another story. ;-) 20+ years from now, maybe not so doable. But today it's not too far from that era to conceive of it.

    still, ultimately I agree, I prefer analog for things of a photographic nature. ( and Musical nature too, most of the time.)

    -Ed

  3. #73
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    I wrote software for a company on the west coast that now no longer exists. I wrote 8" disk drivers for their card, stereo music drivers for another card and some demo software. It was fun, but I would not want to do it again. The Apple ][ stuff was easier to work with than the /// stuff. The /// was a closed system pretty much. The early Mac was a "mess"!!!!! And the 68000 chip was hard to use. We used it at EK early on along with the 6809 for process control. Kodak build a process control computer called the LLM (Lousy Little Machine!). I worked with that in the early 80s along with a 6809 card for the Apple ][.

    Now Ed, back to the main topic.

    PE

  4. #74

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    Digital print media have some decided advantages, and we can only hope that the R&D required to make them as permanent as real photographs is pursued vigorously and successfully. I recently noticed that a digital print had sold at auction for US$4.3M. I wish the buyer luck. As for digital storage, we indeed have a major problem. The media change frequently and rapidly and the content deteriorates, as noted above. My digital image backups are CDs and DVD. I can mostly still read them - even those over 10 years old - but not always. Magnetic media are usually gone in 5 to 7 years, although (with persistence) you can sometimes read older stuff. If the hardware and sufficient documentation is available, you can write a driver that will read older data formats, although it is moderate torture to do so. But you can't read data that isn't there. A sometimes worse problem is the constantly changing interface "standards". You very often can not find the interface hardware to connect an old piece of equipment (like 8" floppies) to the computer. Building such things is possible, but both expensive and difficult.

  5. #75
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    ^ exactly, like firewire going the way of the dodo...

  6. #76

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    PE, thanks for the info on the old Apple stuff. Fun to reminisce on that. Those were simpler days, and more fun I think, as far as computing goes. I miss that era.

  7. #77

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    I can only imagine how this conversation would have transpired forty years ago, discussing how
    archival punch cards are, and what a wonderful invention Fortran was. Somebody would have probably even figured out a way to punch a card into a visual pattern and spray paint through it.

  8. #78
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    Those punch cards are pretty archival as a matter of fact. Most of the photo books I check out have them perfectly preserved in a little envelope on the back cover!


  9. #79

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    Fortran sucked, even back in the 80s. ;-) (and probably before that too)

  10. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by EdSawyer View Post
    Fortran sucked, even back in the 80s. ;-) (and probably before that too)
    I've been translating some Fortran77 to Ada recently. Fortran was a remarkable and very compact language, but it was also error prone. In that regard, C may be even worse.

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