Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,766   Posts: 1,484,142   Online: 773
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Viewing prints

  1. #1
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    2,728
    Images
    336

    Viewing prints

    When you produce a print in the darkroom and bring it out in to the light, do you view it upside down as well at right way up? I find it a useful way of judging if the forms and tones within the composition work. Try turning any HCB print upside down and you will see what I mean.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  2. #2
    ROL
    ROL is offline
    ROL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    689
    I don't think I'll ever be judging a wet HCB print for either tone or composition. Does standing on my head and holding it with my toes to let the fixer drain from my belly button count?

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,231
    Images
    9
    I turn it upside down and reverse it. That is how I saw it when I took the picture.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  4. #4
    Maris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Noosa, Queensland, Australia.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    675
    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    When you produce a print in the darkroom and bring it out in to the light, do you view it upside down as well at right way up? I find it a useful way of judging if the forms and tones within the composition work. Try turning any HCB print upside down and you will see what I mean.
    No I don't look at the photographs I make in my darkroom upside down. But looking at a lens image upside down is the most familiar thing because I use a view camera. As cliveh suggests looking at an image upside down is a strong way of wrenching the eye away from the content of the image, the infatuation with subject matter, to better judge the formal qualities of the picture.

    The H.C-B example cliveh proposes actually underlines the difficulty faced by all users of viewfinder cameras. They never get to see the lens image upside down or otherwise. All they have is a peephole approximately delimiting a segment of the visible world. So the only opportunity for upside down formal picture evaluation may well be in the darkroom. I think I have researched nearly everything available on H.C-B but I can't find any suggestion he looked at his contact sheets upside down. Certainly his mark-ups of those sheets are right-way-up.
    Photography, the word itself, invented and defined by its author Sir John.F.W.Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London. Quote "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..". unquote.

  5. #5
    CPorter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    West KY
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,662
    Images
    24
    I find it does nothing for my perception of how the print values are working in relation to each other.

  6. #6
    PhotoBob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Victoria, BC CANADA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    515
    Blog Entries
    5
    Images
    207
    I will sometimes place it in a tray and take it out into the natural light or/and look at it under the lights in the gallery, which just happens to be right out from the darkroom. I don't usually worry about dry down effect.
    Follow the Light John 8:12
    ~~~PhotoBob

  7. #7
    c6h6o3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    3,137
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    When you produce a print in the darkroom and bring it out in to the light, do you view it upside down as well at right way up? I find it a useful way of judging if the forms and tones within the composition work.
    Its orientation makes no difference to me. What does make a difference is the intensity of the light. Don't take straight out of the darkroom; take it gradually out of the darkroom increasing the light in small increments.

    After I think I may have gotten what I want I walk from a brightly lit room into a dark one with the print watching how the tones change as the light diminishes. A really glowing print will look more contrasty as its surroundings get darker, not less. Sometimes the highlights in my print will literally dance before my eyes as I walk from a lit room into the dark one.
    Jim

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    615
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ANI_8394.jpg 
Views:	45 
Size:	109.1 KB 
ID:	48858I splat mine all wet on the table and tear a few the next morning, when I realize the dry-down ravages.

    Just back from a printing session, 21 16x20 fb prints laying everywhere in the house. Here are 9. Three are going in the Garbage can. That's one tough neg.

  9. #9
    Leigh B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Maryland, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,035
    Images
    1
    If you turn it upside down, the water will run on rather than off and it will never dry.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    615
    I watch Hitchcock movies backwards and listen to Ozzy backwards too. Looking at HCB prints upside down is as good as the other two... Pretty pointless IMO :-)

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin