Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,967   Posts: 1,523,374   Online: 1182
      
Page 7 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast
Results 61 to 70 of 77
  1. #61

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,498
    Yes indeed, everything becomes fussier in color if one expects high quality. But the same lessons
    become valuable at time in black and white work. 120 roll film can be esp fussy to enlarge because
    it tends to be thin and not dimensionally stable. Scanner fluids are a proven asset in scanning per se,
    but in enlargement would mainly serve just to supress dust and Newton rings - but I have no temptation to go there - just too much risk to the original with all that handling and cleaning. I'm prepping for color work now, but keep a more casual setup in a different darkroom for less demanding
    black-and-white printing. Fiber-based paper creates a bit of lint, so when potentially working with
    both processes during the same month, try to keep them isolated. One of the big problems with
    conventional float "window" glass in a carrier is that it picks up dirt and condensation rather easily,
    just like an uncoated lens filter, and also is really nasty if shattered.

  2. #62
    declark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    So. Cal
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    246
    Images
    79
    I have a 6x9 glass carrier for my Beseler and since my setup is in the garage I am always contending with a lot of dust, cat fur etc. I find getting all the surfaces of the glass clean and nothing sandwiched in between a real chore but I do notice a difference in sharpness. Got me to think that maybe a single piece of glass and wet mounting might be easier. Not sure I want to mess with Kami fluid, but has anyone ever tried soaking negative in water with a bit of Photo-Flo to get it to stick?

    My thought is to:
    1) Do a quick wash in water+Flo and wipe to remove any debris.
    2) Stick damp negative to single pane of glass.
    3) Expose.
    4) Dunk negative back in tray with water+Flo and then let dry.

  3. #63

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,498
    Interesting idea if it doesn't dry out during the exposure or buckle anyway. I assume you'll experiment with an insignificant negative before attempting one of value. But you'll get the emulsion
    itself wet and fragile, and any uneveness at all in the drying rate will look a lot worse than Newton
    rings. Sounds like you need a circulating air cleaner out there. When I first started out I developed
    color paper in a drum in the bathroom, did masking work in a the furnace closet, and had the enlarger in a carpeted bedroom. Was that ever hell, esp with big un-retouchable Cibachromes. But
    I still managed to bag a few distinctly highbrow gallery venues. Would be impossible to do it that way
    now, with cats roaming around the house and shedding everywhere.

  4. #64

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Winnipeg, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,301
    I've used a drop of Edwal no scratch to wet mount a negative, works perfectly and a quick rinse off with Ronsonol lighter fluid leaves it clean and dry. Kami fluid is a heavier naptha than Ronsonol mixed with mineral spirits. No Scratch is mostly turpentine, so a mix of turps and a bit of ronsonol will work, so will straight mineral spirits. None will harm a negative and no scrubbing required to clean them afterwards. A quick google for msds sheets will give you the cas numbers and proportions.
    Bob

  5. #65
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NH - Live Free or Die
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,674
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    18
    Don't use water to wet mount. It's very likely you will damage the negatives. Water softens the gelatin so the negative is very fragile when wet.

    Kami is easy to use, and there is tape available that doesn't dissolve in Kami. I imagine the tape will also work fine with your homebrew mounting solution based on naphtha. Make sure you use a mylar cover sheet and don't just tape the negative down.

    I only use wet mounting for scanning. For enlarging I find it easier to print dry between two pieces of glass. It takes less time to remove the dust than to wet mount and clean up afterwards.

  6. #66

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,498
    I'd be concerned about the flammability of any wet or outgassing petrochemical in any enlarger equipped with halogen, or even if the wiring wasn't immaculate. Some enlargers run pretty hot.

  7. #67

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    78
    Images
    14
    Both glassless and glass carriers seemed to have problems even for 35mm. After trying the lot, I have ended up with a top glass but no lower glass. This holds the negative pretty flat, but dispenses with 2 of the dust-bearing surfaces. Obviously the optical quality of the top glass doesn't matter too much, though there are sometimes humid days when I wish mine was anti-Newton.

  8. #68
    Patrick Robert James's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    248
    Images
    35
    I have been using glass carriers for the last 15 years. Combined with a laser alignment tool, the glass carriers deliver the best overall sharpness without a doubt. Cleanliness is certainly an issue, especially if you use a condenser enlarger, but it is worth it in my opinion. I would love to replace the lower glass in my Saunders 4550xl glass carrier with coated glass but haven't found any likely candidates yet. I doubt I would see much improvement at this point with the coated glass but every little bit helps.

  9. #69
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Toronto-Ontario
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    4,625
    Images
    14
    I agree with Patrick
    one note, when we focus we are focusing on the emulsion or grain , which is important to note, if the glass carrier holds the film flat and if the enlarger is aligned I see no issues.

    I have tried the glass only on the top of the neg, it has caused me problems in the pass therefore regular glass bottom AN glass on top for me.
    Humidity in the darkroom will solve a lot of issues and a good cleaning workflow of the glass and negative.


    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Robert James View Post
    I have been using glass carriers for the last 15 years. Combined with a laser alignment tool, the glass carriers deliver the best overall sharpness without a doubt. Cleanliness is certainly an issue, especially if you use a condenser enlarger, but it is worth it in my opinion. I would love to replace the lower glass in my Saunders 4550xl glass carrier with coated glass but haven't found any likely candidates yet. I doubt I would see much improvement at this point with the coated glass but every little bit helps.

  10. #70

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,545
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Robert James View Post
    I have been using glass carriers for the last 15 years. Combined with a laser alignment tool, the glass carriers deliver the best overall sharpness without a doubt. Cleanliness is certainly an issue, especially if you use a condenser enlarger, but it is worth it in my opinion. I would love to replace the lower glass in my Saunders 4550xl glass carrier with coated glass but haven't found any likely candidates yet. I doubt I would see much improvement at this point with the coated glass but every little bit helps.
    You can get coated optical glass from Schneider Optics (Schneider's U.S. arm), cut and bevelled. For pieces in that size they will source it from their cinema/TV filter division. That's what I ended up going with in my Saunders 4550xl 4x5 carrier. In my 35mm carrier for the same enlarger I was able to use Schneider/B+W MRC "Multi Resistant Coating" glass cut from a clear B+W filter. As noted earlier, however, I can't see any difference in print quality compared with the non-coated glass that came with the carriers. And these modifications were not cheap.

Page 7 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin