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  1. #11
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    No need for netural density. Since most graded paper is blue sensitive, you could just up the value
    of the yellow light to slow the exposure time. But why?
    I think you're right, dialing in yellow is probably enough.

    It might be useful in case you run out of f/stops on your enlarging lens and you need a little time to burn and dodge.

    I am always using f/11 and f/22. I don't even know if they are optimum, I am just forced to use those f/stops. (Not with the CLS35, don't know the times I would get from that).

  2. #12

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    Adding cyan is the same as adding minus red. This would be the equivalent of turning your safelights down. Of no usfullnesss in B+ W printing at all. A totally different situation as regards printing colour.
    "There are a great many things I am in doubt about at the moment, and I should consider myself favoured if you would kindly enlighten me. Signed, Doubtful, off to Canada." (BJP 1914).

    Regards
    Bill

  3. #13

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    Really want to thank everyone for the comments and helpful advice! And what about using graded paper? Anyone here familiar with that 0-100 scale to achieve grade 4/ 5?

  4. #14
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    I think you are referring to this insert that says use 150 M if the scale goes to 150 and use 170 M if your scale goes to 170. What they really mean is use Max M and take what you get.

    http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/...8932591755.pdf

    To really get Grade 5, I think you need to add 50 M or 70 M as a filter in the filter drawer (assume your colorhead has one, CLS35 does, and instructions say if you need more density use the filter drawer.

  5. #15

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    Indeed that is the PDF where I got the ref CMY values. I guess I will just scale my values from the maximum 100~grade 4. Any idea on what scale to use? Log, linear? other?

  6. #16

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    I did a linear conversion by taking Ilford's full scale values and dividing, worked fine.
    However, no matter what method you'd use, you will need to do some testing. If you want to get to the exact grades, it's helpful if you have a set of Ilford filters, you can make a set of exposures with the gel filters, and another with your calculated settings and compare.

    A much easier method is to treat it arbritarily which is what it is really anyway. Your end points are fixed, that is, you get the minimum possible contrast with full yellow, and max with full magenta. Everything in between is more of one and less of the other. So if your print needs less contrast take away some magenta and add yellow, or the other way around if you need more, what grade you're at doesn't really matter.

    Make some tests, keep track of the filtration settings so you can use them as reference points, then forget about grades and just print, this is the beauty of variable contrast papers.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by afrank View Post
    Indeed that is the PDF where I got the ref CMY values. I guess I will just scale my values from the maximum 100~grade 4. Any idea on what scale to use? Log, linear? other?
    They are all log scales.

    15 = 1/2 stop, 30 = 1 stop.

    Only reason they give different numbers for enlargers with different ranges is that you have to make different compromises depending on the range you have (or you have more options when your colorhead has a longer range).

    There might be more to it... They may also have done tests with specific enlargers to find optimum values per enlarger.

    But they are all log scales.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by afrank View Post
    ...And what about using graded paper? Anyone here familiar with that 0-100 scale to achieve grade 4/ 5?
    I think this question (and the answering posts that followed it) refer to variable contrast, not graded, paper.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sal Santamaura View Post
    I think this question (and the answering posts that followed it) refer to variable contrast, not graded, paper.
    Yes, the topic has drifted into variable contrast paper territory.

  10. #20
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    Easy to test. Just decide on a standard set of Y and M values for example #2 grade. Then check the other grades to see if they print at the same exposure. If the print is too light then subtract equal amounts of yellow and magenta and correct your exposure chart accordingly. If the prints are too dark, then add equal amounts of magenta and yellow. That way you can tweak your chart to your enlarger.

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