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  1. #1

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    Color Head & FIXED Grade Paper

    I am using a CLS 66 Color head that doesnt use any of the standard YMC range values 0-130/170.
    My has a maximum of 100. I was wondering if changing Magenta would affect NON Multi grade Paper.
    If so I already have my times without magenta set up, what kind of exposure correction should I use if I dial in 50m or even 100m? If noone knows, how should I go about making tests to find out?

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Why would you want to do that? Is there something wrong with good old white light?

    If you add magenta in the light path, you reduce the amount of light that the paper is actually sensitive to. You gain nothing.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #3

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    Is there no contrast control on normal graded paper with magenta?

  4. #4
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    No. You're better off tweaking your paper developer to adjust contrast. Dektol in one bath, and 120 in another. You can play with dilution too.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #5
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by afrank View Post
    Is there no contrast control on normal graded paper with magenta?
    That is correct.
    Best to us no filtration, unless your printing times are too short. Then you can use yellow and/or magenta to filtration to increase printing times.

    Some heads are designed up so that 15cc of filtration approximates one-half stop of density.

  6. #6
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    No... put your head at white light to get the most light output.

  7. #7
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Bob's saying no to your original question. Graded paper does not give you different contrast grades in response to changes in color, you only get different exposure times depending on how much "actinic" light gets through (think opposite color of your safelight ... blue).

    If you want longer print times, adding M + Y in equal amounts can cut the light, like a neutral density filter. As IC-Racer pointed out, by design, these are numbered using "as-if densities" without the decimal point, making 15 a half-stop 30 a whole stop etc.

    As Thomas pointed out, changing contrast (often hear it is up to a half-grade change) can be done by changing the developer chemistry. You could also intensify your negatives. You can also dodge and burn to extend darker and lighter tones than a straight print would deliver. I consider all these options when the negative doesn't match the paper I want to use.

  8. #8
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by afrank View Post
    I am using a CLS 66 Color head that doesnt use any of the standard YMC range values 0-130/170.
    My has a maximum of 100.
    I just checked the instructions on my CLS 35... Indeed the calibration of the filters is density... Each division represents 0.01 density.

  9. #9
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Hey Bill

    If you want to create nuetral density reduction or increase one would use all three filters CMY equally.
    We always used a two bath developer and water tray to soften or increase contrast slightly with graded paper, but even then it was limited.

    Bob

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    Bob's saying no to your original question. Graded paper does not give you different contrast grades in response to changes in color, you only get different exposure times depending on how much "actinic" light gets through (think opposite color of your safelight ... blue).

    If you want longer print times, adding M + Y in equal amounts can cut the light, like a neutral density filter. As IC-Racer pointed out, by design, these are numbered using "as-if densities" without the decimal point, making 15 a half-stop 30 a whole stop etc.

    As Thomas pointed out, changing contrast (often hear it is up to a half-grade change) can be done by changing the developer chemistry. You could also intensify your negatives. You can also dodge and burn to extend darker and lighter tones than a straight print would deliver. I consider all these options when the negative doesn't match the paper I want to use.

  10. #10

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    No need for netural density. Since most graded paper is blue sensitive, you could just up the value
    of the yellow light to slow the exposure time. But why?

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