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  1. #1

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    Solarizing a print

    I have an image I'd like to solarize.

    Is the process in general, process the print as normal and during the development phase, toward the end, BRIEFLY flash it with light? I really didn't find much on this process. If anyone has a better instructions or link to it, I'd appreciate sharing.

    Thanks.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  2. #2
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I have an image I'd like to solarize.

    Is the process in general, process the print as normal and during the development phase, toward the end, BRIEFLY flash it with light? I really didn't find much on this process. If anyone has a better instructions or link to it, I'd appreciate sharing.

    Thanks.
    For a detailed response the following is probably the definitive source -

    http://www.cchem.berkeley.edu/wljeme/SOUTLINE.html

    But to get you there quick, refer to page 16 of 16 - Getting aquainted with the technique.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  3. #3

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    Tkamiya, that is the general idea. Others with experience doing this could comment with more specifics - ie at what point during development is it best to flash, how quick to flash, right wattage, bulb distance etc.

    By the way in printing technically this is not solarization as it is a partial reversal. It's the Sabattier effect.

    There's a good explanation with procedures in The Print from the Time Life photography series, but no doubt there are also APUG members who have experience doing it and can direct you.

  4. #4
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I agree about William Jolly , all my work has been to his notes.
    I solarize both print and negative. PE welcome to jump in here and state what we do is not solarization.

    Metol, sodium sulfite, sodium carbonate, sodium bromide for the first dev
    Potassium Bromide flood for the second developer if you want a more funkier toning solution.

    I flash half way between the development two minutes in first -- put print in second dev-- flash-- process out as normal , stop fix wash exactly as normal
    I have a permanent flashing unit hooked to a timer which gives more or less power with a stop system.. the flash is set at a distance to be able to easily flash 30 x40 prints.
    I adjust the power based on the size of the prints.

    I also use this same system now for my 8x10 negatives , I do two at a time and flash half way between the developer. for film I do not use a Potassium Bromide charge.
    Also slight under exposure of the original scene works well. The camera image is recent and is a negative solarization, I am using an 100yr old studio 8x10 camera with hot lights and for table top work have a f22 four steamboat exposure.

    This is really one of the most enjoyable processes I have ever done and it is my long term goal to keep making these kinds of prints for show work.
    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I have an image I'd like to solarize.

    Is the process in general, process the print as normal and during the development phase, toward the end, BRIEFLY flash it with light? I really didn't find much on this process. If anyone has a better instructions or link to it, I'd appreciate sharing.

    Thanks.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 9440.jpg  

  5. #5

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    Holy cow.... this is an involved process.... thanks everybody.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  6. #6
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    but kick ass

  7. #7

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    The article says to use a specialized developer or in the past, well-used Dektol was used. Hum.... Is it even possible to play around with this procedure with fresh Dektol?

    The only paper developers I have handy are Dektol and Ilford Warm Tone.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  8. #8
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    You can play around and waste paper, but you really are looking for a Metol agent developer. The mix is very easy , if Ian pumps in I think it maybe very close to the Selectol Soft developer...

    IMO mix from Mr Jollys great formulas and you will have fun and not need the round paper basket as much.
    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    The article says to use a specialized developer or in the past, well-used Dektol was used. Hum.... Is it even possible to play around with this procedure with fresh Dektol?

    The only paper developers I have handy are Dektol and Ilford Warm Tone.

  9. #9

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    This is getting expensive....
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  10. #10
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Scratch Chemistry is way cheaper than pre packaged, and it is very rewarding .

    You need to find a good chemical supplier in Florida or one of the Southern States and purchase wisely.


    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    This is getting expensive....

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