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  1. #11

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    I have a cheap laundry sink also, and I don't have any trouble with it. It's deep enough to easily clean my larger trays, and also prop them up in there to drain and dry. And it was only like 20 bucks at Home Depot.

  2. #12
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    Couple of thoughts (two being the maximum amount I can handle in a short space of time)...

    Make the bottom of the sink at a comfortable height for rocking the dishes: I found I preferred the bottom of the sink to be about 4 inches lower than the dry side counter (which bought the top lip of the sink to about the same height), but I am 5'7" so if you are taller....

    I used to ventilate in to the loft in my previous accommodation which had a windowless bathroom with a ventilation fan blowing into said loft. Worked OK(ish), but the fan wasn't really up to the job and a faint odour would permeate the whole place on a calm day...

    My current 'proper'(ish) 10' square darkroom blows air out through two 6" bathroom fans mounted on a board fixed over the window. Just about enough air movement but noisy. Long term plan is to get an industrial fan and move it outside and use ducting to suck the air out: no noise. If possible, think about putting the fans in the loft with ducting coming in to the darkroom and do the sucking business if you go down that route - I found that any wood you mount the fans on to acts as a sounding board to magnify the noise...

    Have fun! Bob.

  3. #13
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    Since the dividing wall is not permenant, who not cut a hole in it, use that funky flexible ducting tubing to go to the window and sue the vent on a board in it? Then when you move, you can take the vent with you.
    Non Digital Diva

  4. #14
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    The more I think about it, the less I like the idea of venting into the attic space. Remember, the convection in the attic is based on the assumption that the air entering through the vents at the lower edge of the roof will be cooler than the air at the top of the space. How the air from inside the darkroom might fit that temperature range at different time of the So. Cal. year might present a problem.

    I like the idea of using flexible ducting and a drier-style vent (to the outside) much better. That would also facilitate placing a stronger duct fan outside the darkroom, and midway along the flexible duct, to reduce noise.

    I would not, however, try to connect a Y fitting to an existing drier vent tube. Too great a possibility for drier lint to be pumped into the darkroom when the darkroom fan wasn't on.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  5. #15
    blaze-on's Avatar
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    I think I have decided it's best to vent directly outside....The sink area will be to an outside wall, and a small hole for a drier vent hose will be fairly easy to patch if needed.

    I think I'll also build a sink outta wood, which will allow a more custom fit to my arena anyway.

    I also think for incoming vent I will use the space between the 2x4's in new wall and put a couple HVAC wall vents on opposite sides, one at top, one at bottom.

    Now just have to figure out plumbing route et al. Bathroom adjacent and I was originally going to keep it a dry dkroom, but I think I'll be happier with everything I need (or think I do) all in the same room.

    Thanks to all for the great suggestions and concerns. I'm always willing to change my mind if there's another thought or more out there. Peace.
    Matt's Photo Site
    "I invent nothing, I rediscover". Auguste Rodin

  6. #16
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    In general, the best way to ventillate a darkroom is to blow air INTO the darkroom through filters (to remove any dust). What this does is cause the air pressure inside the darkroom to be slightly greater than outside, and any parastic air flow will therefore be from the inside out. As a result, you get better control over dust.

    Using a joist or stud space for ventillation makes lots of sense, but one of the challenges is getting something that provides decent air flow but that does not create so much noise that you can't think. In my new darkroom I used the space between a couple of floor joists to construct a box. I put an air filter between the joists, and then mounted a small computer-type muffin fan at one end to draw air through the filter. Then, I used a length of plastic vent pipe (the kind intended for ventillating bathrooms) to direct the air from the outlet of the fan into the darkroom. Making the box separate from the darkroom, and using a muffin fan, made the resulting ventillation system totally silent.

    Plumbing in a darkroom is another problem. Getting water in is relatively easy - but getting waste water out may not be, especially if your darkroom is in a basement. I collect water in a reservoir (a large rubbermaid tub), and then use a sump pump to lift it to the point where it can flow down into the house drain system.

  7. #17
    gma
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    I hope you will keep in mind that you might move someday. Patched holes in siding will be hard to explain and fixer odor will be almost impossible to remove from the room.

  8. #18

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    Don't forget to check Ebay or other used places for sinks. Sometimes you can find a good one much cheaper then building one yourself. I like your incoming air design using the space in the wall with high and low grilles. People say to paint the inside cavity with flat black paint. Make sure that the air flow doesn't pull the air back into you from the sink. One slick method I've seen used a large Plastic pipe/tube with lots of holes drilled in it mounted along the back of the sink. The pipe was connected to an external blower to pull air out of the room. Ideally you want your air intake set to pull fumes from the trays away from you not up and over your face. To find your fan CFM figure on needing 4-5 changes per hour. But I'm really not sure how much you have to lower the rating of the blower to take into account your ducting system.

  9. #19
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    I perhaps should have mentioned that within this new area to be, there is a return air vent in ceiling for the central HVAC system. What effect, good or bad, will that have?

    I understand there is a positive or negative pressure vent possibility, but I am not sure which is best or ideal.

    I will be remodeling the adjoining bathroom which needs a new subfloor and will be building a new shower in parallel with the darkroom sink separated by the wall. My thought was to run the drain from dkrm sink through this wall and leave one blank 4" tile square in the shower wall for the drain pipe to fit through and just let it run into shower drain. I will fabricate a cap to fit this while shower is in use. kinda cheesy but it eliminates the tearing open of walls or floor for plumbing. Thoughts?

    The house is on a raised foundation. If I were willing to open the floor up for plumbing, it would be a piece of cake, but the wood floors are original and as mentioned, refinished.

    Some good suggestions that have helped me further define my approach-thanks.
    Matt's Photo Site
    "I invent nothing, I rediscover". Auguste Rodin

  10. #20
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
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    About ventilation, using two bathroom fans above the trays and vented to the outside sounds good. You can get quiet fans - they are all rated for sones and cfm. Positive pressure and remote fan systems would not be efficient and would require industrial size fans to work properly.

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