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  1. #1

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    What is this? Printing question.....

    Have a look at the image below. What the heck is going on in the upper edge of this print? It looks like it got some extra exposure from somewhere, but where? The only thing I can think of is that my safe light added a little extra to this image when it was in the holding tray (there were other prints on top of this one which would have caused the edges) but that would be after it had gone through the fixer..


    Jalanis Print 004 by robb albrecht, on Flickr

    I'm no expert on printing so any ideas would be greatly appreciated 'cause I'm stumped....

  2. #2

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    It's not just the upper edge but all long the right side as well. Because it's so regular and sharp, I bet something involving time in tray is responsible.

    Try NOT stacking and see what happens. It could be a light leak in your darkroom and shadow from edge is causing it. Do you expose another print while previously exposed prints are in tray before they are well fixed? That could be an issue too, along with not-so-safe safe light.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #3

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    looks as if it was slightly fogged before you used it to print -- the square corners are the tip-off. Someone accidentally leave the light-tight box a titch open? You got rug rats who have been secretly investigating things in your darkroom?

    then there's the possibility that it was not completely fixed -- using fresh chemical?

    Whatever, it happens. Toss it and print again.

    oh yeah, and make sure your safe light is the right color for that paper AND not too close to where you are working ... safe lights can fog.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by summicron1 View Post
    looks as if it was slightly fogged before you used it to print -- the square corners are the tip-off. Someone accidentally leave the light-tight box a titch open? You got rug rats who have been secretly investigating things in your darkroom?

    then there's the possibility that it was not completely fixed -- using fresh chemical?

    Whatever, it happens. Toss it and print again.

    oh yeah, and make sure your safe light is the right color for that paper AND not too close to where you are working ... safe lights can fog.


    +1

  5. #5
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    If that's the case, make test strips out of the fogged paper.

  6. #6

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    Thanks for the replies, guys.
    Is it possible that different brands of paper require different fixing times? With the same method, I don't get this with the Ilford paper I usually print with.
    I'm going to move my safe light up a bit and put in a shelf for my papers so the little one isn't tempted to open any paper boxes.
    I'll try a longer fix time when I print tonight.

  7. #7

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    This doesn't look like a fixer problem.
    That said, it is possible to get fogging in the fix if you turn on white lights prematurely. I've never managed to do it, however, even by turning on the lights with prints in the fix <30 seconds.
    It would be more likely to occur if you're stop bath is spent and you are using an alkaline fix, or if the fix is spent. Safelight fogging in the fixer would be extremely unlikely.

    Some papers could require more time, it's hard to determine without doing tests for retained silver in the paper. Most manufactures have recommended fix times, and if you work according to those requirements with unspent fixer you should be fine.

    Some papers have different safelight requirements too, for example Ilford papers are ok with amber safelights but some of the eastern European papers require red safelights.

  8. #8
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Could this be flare reflecting off of the inner edge of the negative carrier?
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2



 

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