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  1. #21

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    Initially, under an 8 watt cool white fluorescent in the darkroom while the print is still wet. (This is a bit too bright, and I will switch to some white LEDs soon.) That tells me if my exposure is pretty much on. Later, when dry, under the multiple fluorescent shop lights that light the darkroom. That tells me if the print is worth keeping and if I need to reprint with some more subtle changes than I recognized before. Critically, under high CRI daylight fluorescents in my lightroom area. That tells me whether I can mount and exhibit the print. (Not many pass.) Fortunately, the exact color of the light is not too critical for black and white, and regular fluorescents and incandescents are quite OK for routine evaluations. But for critical evaluation, you should look at the print in in the same light as it will be in when exhibited. For black and white especially, the matting and framing can have a greater effect on the look of the print than then light. It is often helpful to keep some mattes around of the kinds of material you like to use and to look at the print under them for a critical evaluation.

  2. #22

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    I prefer a standard 60w incandescent bulb about 5 feet away. It's based on the level of lighting I usually see at museums (not that my stuff will be in any museums any time soon...). Never judge wet prints. Dry them and live with them for a while.

    Like Brian, I have struggled with this. It's not the level of illumination I have a problem with, but the print color. I try to stay away from looking at my prints under daylight for that reason (and I print at night anyway) but sometimes I can't help myself and days later I'll keep walking around the house to see what the print looks like under different kinds of light, mixed daylight/incandescent etc.

    I'll throw another wrench in - the mat board color in relation to the print color. Walk around with a mounted print and try incandecent vs daylight vs halogen spots vs mixed lighting. Yikes.

    To Mainecoonmaniac: Dry down is not an issue unless you make final printing decisions based on wet prints. Dry your test prints either in a microwave or with a hairdryer or whatever. Eliminate the variable.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    i use rrelatively dim darkroom lighting for print evaluation,roughly EV6, which in my case comes from a single 60wbulbfrom 2m away.whatever looks good in dim lighting will look great in brighter illumination. using bright fluorecent lighting in the darkroom to evaluate print progress is a big mistake IMO,because what looks good then will look bland and without sparkle in normal room lighting.from dim to bright, bo problem. the other way around is tricky
    Ralph:

    See page 241 of edition 1 of your book - two bulbs!
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #24
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    As Ralph already decribed: I uses relatively dim light to asess the print. This gives some comensation for the dry down effect. Bright light is counterproductive and will lead to prints which are to dark.
    The test strips for real critical prints thought for longer exhibition should be evaluated dried and in a lightning similar to that of exhibition. As St. Ansel proposed you can dry prints very fast in a mircowave oven.
    ---
    Uwe Pilz

  5. #25

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    whatever light happens to be there. see some life in the shadows, see some life in the highlights? nothing solid white or black? good enough. this is the last thing that bears on the "quality" of a photograph anyway. consider this: i have attended exhibitions for years--many fabulous photographs, many lousy prints, frequently it's the same picture that's a fabulous photograph and and a lousy print


  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    i use rrelatively dim darkroom lighting for print evaluation,roughly EV6, which in my case comes from a single 60wbulbfrom 2m away.
    Well I don't know how you get an EV of 6 from a 60w bulb at 2m. I went out and bought a couple of bulbs and as you can't get standard incandecent bulbs any more I had to get "energy saving" halogens. When I fitted one of these I only get an EV of 5 at 2m and I have to come to about a meter to get EV 6 but after the 11w compact fluorescent I had in my darkroom befor it looks anything other than dim and my prints look similar to viewing next to a window with the advantage of consistancy.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Man View Post
    Well I don't know how you get an EV of 6 from a 60w bulb at 2m.
    As the ISO has not been determined then it is obviously possible. However, if we assume this to be LV (or EV at ISO 100) then you could have a point.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  8. #28

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    Essential for critical color correction and inexpensive to set up an MR-16 array....http://www.solux.net/cgi-bin/tlistor...-proofing.html

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    As the ISO has not been determined then it is obviously possible. However, if we assume this to be LV (or EV at ISO 100) then you could have a point.
    Sorry should have said I was also been looking at this thread and was indeed using ISO 100

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by frotog View Post
    Essential for critical color correction and inexpensive to set up an MR-16 array....
    Easy to set up ...maybe
    Essential for critical color correction..........I agree they are good for colour proofing, but I think they are unnecessary for B & W
    Inexpensive.........well they maybe in the US but here in the UK they are about £13.00 a bulb with no fitting

    Also I am not in favour of using spot lamps for illuminating works as they tend to produce hot spots unless you several diffused lamps, a traditional bare bulb at a reasonable distance produces a much more even light.

    Dose not Vilk have a point that as long as you are happy with the levels of shadow and highlight detail trying to produce prints to the environment in which they will be displayed will just result in prints with either greater or lesser amounts of contrast?

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