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  1. #1

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    wet mounting in a glass carrier

    Has anyone tried wet mounting negatives in a glass carrier for enlarging? As far as I understand, in the *gasp* digital world wet mounting negatives is standard practice for the highest quality scanning. Among many benefits it virtually eliminates dust problems, eliminates newton rings, confirms flat registration of the negative, and leads to a sharper, truer contrast read of the negative probably by somehow reducing spurious and imperfect light reflection/refraction (I think this has something to do with the perfect surfaces created by the mounting fluid and the glass).

    Also, I haven't confirmed yet, but I believe it may slightly change the working density of the negative by swelling the emulsion and thus spreading the grain. This is the same effect that we see in a glistening wet print (which later dries down to something different than what we expected ;-) ). I'm not sure if this is a proportional, linear, or subproportional density change, but it might prove to be a useful tool for the printer's toolbox.

    Anyone tried this? Any thoughts/experiences?

  2. #2
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    It has always been standard practice to coat badly scratched negatives with glycerine and sandwich them between 2 pieces of glass, so the idea will certainly work in theory, it's just rather messy! The trend with scanners (Imacon Flextight) is to arc the scanned material for flatness rather than use liquid, simply to avoid cleaning afterwards.

    Regards,

    David

  3. #3
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    I have not tried this in an enlarger, but I bet it would give excellent results. If you use the Kami mouting fluid there should be almost no clean up as it evaporates completly. You would need to tape all the edges though to keep the fuid there. Next time I have a badly curled negative I will try this.

  4. #4

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    Oiling negatives

    I have some experience in oiling negatives. My results are mixed. All my experience is with 35mm. I have used both Kami SMF 2001 and Dow Corning 200 viscosity 100. The reason given for oiling negatives is varied. One source says that it changes the refraction index of the gelatin to match air or glass. The other opinion is that it changes the refraction of the air to match glass. I have no idea which opinion is correct. In the scanning industry the Kami fluid is used. The Dow Corning 200 fluid...viscosity 100 is the choice of Bob Pace. When I use the Kami, I get spots that have dried and this shows on the print. When I use the Dow Corning fluid...viscosity 100 I am always left with at least one tiny bubble on the negative. If you ever desire to see how sharp a circle can be on a print this will show you. The Kami is to be used with a special and pricey tape. This tape will not turn into goo as will other tapes when exposed to the Kami fluid. When you are done the negative can be lightly wiped with a Pec pad. If you use the Dow Corning 200 Fluid..viscosity 100 the reccomended cleaning is to dip the negative in three sequential baths of film cleaner and to hang up to dry. The negatives are handled with a tweezer.
    If you have a negative that is used with either of theses fluids any marks or imbedded dust will most likely disappear.

    For me this has been a technique that I have yet to master.

    The fact that a printer of Bob Paces caliber recommends the Dow Corning 200 Fluid...viscosity 100 tells me right off the bat that it is capable of working well. I have used this in my Condit pin registered oil immersion carrier. I also have a matching punch and pin glasses..

  5. #5

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    In his book Post Exposures, Ctein oils in film for enlargements as standard practice. He uses Edwal No Scratch which is a transparent oil that has the same index of refraction as film and eliminates dust and scratches. He claims it is much quicker to oil and clean the negative then it is to spot each print.

    From my own experiences I am in complete agreement. I do very big enlargements and small dust spots not visible on smaller prints become very noticeable on big stuff. It only takes about two drops of oil to coat the film. I clean the film after with PEC-12.

    It will work with both color and b&w negatives and also helps minimize Newton rings.

    B&H sells Edwal No Scratch, but cannot ship it because it is classified as hazardous material. Calumet sells it and ships it for about $10 a bottle plus shipping.

  6. #6
    clayne's Avatar
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    Thing is, in opposition to spotting - which is easy to reproduce - how much will negatives put up with this before they start to degrade?
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  7. #7
    flash26c's Avatar
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    I've used Edwal No Scratch and it works really well. I had never thought to use it on all my negatives -----

  8. #8
    rmolson's Avatar
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    wet mounting

    Years ago I used a liquid carrier on an 8x10 durst condenser enlarger to make color separations The carrier required a frame for the slide to rest in,. otherwise it would float. We would hinge the slide with a piece of tape and then carefully drop by drop fill the frame space .with the fluid . We used regular baby oil or glycerin in a pinch then drop by drop a light film of oil was placed on top of the slide and the cover glass gently lowered on the carrier. It was a messy process but at the time hide all the scratches on the base side of the slides. When we got scanners we still oil mounted them on the drums for the same reason. We never used it to hide dirt. Just careful cleaning and neutralizing any static took care of that. I have never tried it with B&W all my enlargers are equipped with cold lights negating the need to hide base line scratches.

  9. #9
    richard ide's Avatar
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    I regularly mounted negatives with mineral spirits in horizontal enlargers using only one piece of glass. It was very fast to change negatives.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

  10. #10

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    Be careful with flammable liquids and hi-watt enlargers.

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