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  1. #11
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nicholai View Post
    Thanks for the replies!
    The background IS totally clear on neg, the mid/highs are too clear though (not dense enough)

    jp498: Sure, but how will i get that back to my ilford paper?

    I have some TT blue toner and TT sulphide toner, will these do? I'm not worried about prolonged archival ability.
    It sounds like your film is under-exposed, and possibly also underdeveloped. Under-exposure is the most likely. It is not uncommon for people with cameras to attempt to make a low key image of a normal subject by reducing exposure, it rarely works.

    Selenium toning is not the only way to increase contrast in a negative. Sepia toning will increase highlight density 2-3 times as much. No intensification will help if the film is under-exposed because there is no reduced silver with which to work.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  2. #12
    AndreasT's Avatar
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    You could copy the negative onto lith film develope it relatively hard and copy that again onto another sheet of lith film.
    This sometimes works for me but is rather time consuming. Or if you backlight the negativ with two lamps at a flat angle and photograph it and develope it hard you could get a new negative.
    I do not know what this process is called but this used to be done. Myself I have never done this. But I am planning to in the future.
    Selenium toner does not really help with very thin negatives.
    Does Chromium Intensifier still work with negatives which have been selen toner already.
    Does anybody know?

  3. #13

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    Be aware that no amount of intensification can create shadow detail where none exists.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  4. #14
    nicholai's Avatar
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    I have no desire for more shadow detail, i want my background to be tarblack! I only want my highs and mids of the subject to be brighter.
    Bear in mind this is from a low-key shoot. Here is a digital picture from the same shoot. The highlights and mids are good here. I kept the settings, which of course i shouldnt have done. Allthough it works here, the pictures i did on film prints bad.
    Nicholai Nissen
    Kolding, Denmark
    nicholainissen@gmail.com

  5. #15
    eddie's Avatar
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    One thing you can try is to make a test print which gets your mids/highs to where you want them. Expose for that time, but have hot, undiluted developer available. Pull the print (early in the development process), place it on plexi (or glass) and paint the shadows with the hot developer. You can use a soft sponge, cotton balls, or Q-Tips. It will require some testing, as the highs/mids will continue to emerge while out of the tray. You'll have to figure out when to pull the print, so the highs/mids don't move past where you want them in the final print, but it will get your shadows to go darker quicker. Not an elegant solution, but it may help in this case.

  6. #16

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    Your post about a blacked out background is now clearer. You are trying to increase the contrast only, so the selenium (or other) intensification may work. For an extreme possibility try contact printing a paper-print on to another sheet of paper, then contacting that again to get your final result. It is also possible to adjust density on the back of the paper "interneg" with pencil, or paint etc, in order to mask the result when it is contacted again. This sort of approach might achieve what you want.

  7. #17
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Give up. You can't bring back what is not there.

  8. #18
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
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    Use a no. 5 filter and print it so the blacks are good, then bleach back the highlights and midtone areas.

    Jon
    Mendocino Coast Black and White Photography: www.jonshiu.com

  9. #19
    nicholai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    Give up. You can't bring back what is not there.
    ... thats not what i'm trying to, which you would know if you read my post/comments thoroughly.


    To the others, thanks so far, i'll try and see what i can do.
    Nicholai Nissen
    Kolding, Denmark
    nicholainissen@gmail.com

  10. #20

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    Contrast increase mask

    A contrast increase mask is a powerful tool for low contrast negatives. Learn about masks at :

    MaskingKits.com

    Good luck.

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