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  1. #1
    macandal's Avatar
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    Making an enlargement

    First of all, let it be known that I'm a newbie. I just learned how to process and make prints of my film. I work on 35mm and 4x5.

    All aspects of photography are so exact until you get to making an enlargement of a photography. What I mean is that there is nothing that secures your paper in place while you make a print. I'm sorry but I'm still learning the names of the things one uses to make prints, so I'll do my best to describe what I mean. Once I have the negative I want to enlarge, I use a piece of paper similar in size to the paper I'm going to use for the enlargement, say an 8x10 white sheet of paper, or the back of a used piece of film paper. I place the paper in the holding tray, the tray that holds the paper (again, sorry about not yet knowing all the names), and focus my image. Once this is focused, I carefully remove the used piece of paper and replace it with a new one, again, careful not to move the holder thing, and make the print.

    I'm surprised that there isn't anything that aids the process of holding the paper down so as not to move it out of place. Because that tray is just laying there, anything can knock it out of place. If you're not careful, you can easily move it out of place and you have to start all over again to find your place.

    Did I make sense? Do you guys (and gals) know what I'm talking about? Is this how printing is done or does my school (where I'm learning film processing) just have very old enlargers? Meaning, with the new ones you don't have this problem?

    Thanks for listening/reading. Any tips will be appreciated.

  2. #2
    eddie's Avatar
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    By "holding tray" do you mean an easel? The easel shouldn't move when you open it to change from a focusing sheet to the unexposed paper.

  3. #3
    macandal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    By "holding tray" do you mean an easel? The easel shouldn't move when you open it to change from a focusing sheet to the unexposed paper.
    Yes, and it does. Like I said, this may just mean that my school has very old equipment.

    How do you keep the easel from moving?

  4. #4
    Kav
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    Re: Making an enlargement

    I wonder too if you are using an easel. Here is one style that let's you use paper up to 8x10. It holds the paper in place and allows you to make repeatable prints.


  5. #5
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    A good quality easel should have enough weight to keep from moving. If the one you're using moves, try a little Two-sided tape, "Blue-Tack", or "Sticky-Tack" on the bottom of the easel. Even some chewed gum would work. You just need something which will adhere the easel to the enlarger baseboard.

  6. #6
    macandal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kav View Post
    I wonder too if you are using an easel. Here is one style that let's you use paper up to 8x10. It holds the paper in place and allows you to make repeatable prints.

    Kav, thanks. Ok, buy how do you keep the easel itself from moving all over the place? Like I said, if you're not careful, you could easily move that easel out of place.

  7. #7

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    Type of easel pictured has rubber feet as you can see (and on both sides). They keep the easel in place with friction and weight.

    Larger easels often have rubber or foam sheet glued on underside. With weight and friction, they won't easily move.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  8. #8
    macandal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    A good quality easel....
    Fat chance. That, we don't have. The ones we use are metal, but quite light. They can so easily be moved out of place by ... staring at them. Maybe it's time I invest in some good quality easels.

  9. #9
    macandal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    Type of easel pictured has rubber feet as you can see (and on both sides). They keep the easel in place with friction and weight.

    Larger easels often have rubber or foam sheet glued on underside. With weight and friction, they won't easily move.
    Yes, Tk, I see that. What brand are those and where do I get them? New or used? How much should I pay for them? I hope they also come in larger sizes. I also print 11x14, etc. Thanks.

  10. #10
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    Before you buy an easel, try folding some duct tape over, in reverse, so it sticks to the baseboard and the easel.

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