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  1. #11
    SuzanneR's Avatar
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    Thank you, Les. I'm going to keep working on this, but I think I'm off to a good start, and may add a little dodging and burning. I'll let you know if I have any trouble.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suzanne Revy
    Larry,

    I just uploaded some photographs I printed using a similar technique in the standard gallery, my first attempts using this method. I followed the instructions in Les McLean's book, and loved the results. My question to you is, do you use this technique with all your negs, or just contrasty ones? Fortunately, I didn't have to dodge or burn anything, which leads me to my next question... do you find that you have to dodge and burn less using split grade printing? And lastly, as I have a color head, I found my soft filtration worked best at 80Y, (grade 0) and full yellow made the soft filter exposures too long, and too different from the 200M (grade 5); do you use the full yellow to standardize for any paper, or do you vary the filtration depending on the paper... if that makes sense??

    Thanks for the informative post, between this and Les' book, I think I'm starting to really understand split grade printing.

    Kind regards,
    Suzanne

    Suzanne,

    Yes, I use split filter printing for all my negs. Haven't done anything else for 25 years.

    Yes, I do find that I have less burning and dodging to do. I think it's because the separate exposures, each at full settings, actually bring out all the shadow and highlight detail that's in the negative. That said, I still do use burning and dodging frequently, particularly when I have (1) a negative that's not as well-exposed or developed as it should be, and (2) when I want to make deliberate changes to the density or contrast in some part of the image for aesthetic reasons. With most well-exposed negs, the basic M and Y exposures will get you very close on the first try, once you've established your basic printing times for a specific paper.

    I do always give full yellow and full magenta exposures. I can't say why your yellow exposures give you widely varying times from your magenta exposure. May be your colorhead or filtration system is different from mine. I have a Beseler Colorhead. Also, papers vary considerably in what their emulsions require. E.g. Ilford and Forte papers usually want about twice as much magenta as yellow. Agfa times are less widely separated.

    My basic times for Agfa MCC, for example, are

    at 8 X10 size print and f/11 lens setting: 8 sec. full magenta; 6 sec. full yellow.

    at 11 X 14 at f/11: 12 sec M; 9 sec Y

    Of course, this is to produce prints to my subjective taste in contrast and density. Your preferences may be different. I tend to like full information in shadows and highlights, so I tend not to go for a lot of stark blacks or stark whites.

    You may wish to try this in conjunction with a divided developer formula as well. I have an article and formulas in the "Chemistry recipes">"Paper Developers" section if you're interested. I've also used this method of development exclusively for 25 years.

    Larry

  3. #13
    SuzanneR's Avatar
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    Thank you Larry, it's great to get advice from people with so much experience. I'm not ready to try the divided developer just yet... one thing at a time! But I think I may employ this technique a lot. It was really easy, and I think you are right about the exposure times. The last neg I printed I didn't do any exposure testing... time was running out, and I had to pick up the kids! Both the other negs I had printed came up with the same times, and that last neg was nearly perfect.

    It's snowing today... no school, so I won't be able to try it again til next week!

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