Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,338   Posts: 1,537,713   Online: 785
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 29 of 29

Thread: 6 x 9 question

  1. #21
    adelorenzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    517
    6x9 negatives are amazing... You should definitely get the camera.

    I presently have two enlargers but both are only 6x6. I just got out of the darkroom and was printing a couple of 6x9 negatives using my 6x6 carrier onto 8x10 paper, so quite a bit of a crop but I got two really good prints. I'll eventually try to get a larger enlarger.

    Trying a contact print or two sounds like a good idea as well. Will have to try that one day.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    45
    Ha, there was a 6X9 enlarger made in Shanghai. It look like a long black lamp housing sit aside a ladder. A well build enlarger for B&W. check the local photo supply or used market.

  3. #23
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,867
    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    If you're waiting until you get back to the States, you'll have a ton of options. Don't worry about it now. Concentrate on making negatives. (If you can, the advice to contact print them now is a good idea.)
    +1.

    I'd actually recommend looking for a 4x5 enlarger once you're back, even if you don't think you'll want to print from larger than 6x9. For the Omega D2/DII (what I have) and Besseler 45 series, accessories are extremely common, and the bigger chassis will be more solid for working with all sizes, and leave you the option of going to 4x5 later if you should decide to do so. They don't even take up significantly more space than, say, a 23CII. But while common the 23CII is probably more common.

    They're very cheap these days, the problem is shipping (even within the US) or even finding someone willing to ship them. A guy on the large format forum just gave away two nice looking 4x5 enlargers free for picking up, if you happen to be in his part of Canada. I got a spare Omega D2V for $25.

  4. #24
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,867
    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I've never seen one available. Where are you finding those?
    I have one someone threw in with the spare D2V I bought, $25 for the package. I don't have a 6x9 camera yet, but may, and wouldn't mind finding a 6x9 RF back for my view camera. I have a 6x7 roll film back now, though, so it's definitely nothing I'm in a hurry about.

  5. #25
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,195
    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    I am interested in learning about enlarging negatives in the 6 x 9 format. I recall long ago that ease of enlarging stopped at 6 x 7 and that with the 6 x 9 size, the number of available enlargers decreases dramatically. In other words, the 6 x 9 format is much more rare to print due to the need of a special type enlarger.

    Is this true? If I am interested in printing at home in future, should i stay with 6 x 7 or smaller? I know nothing about enlarging and am only going on a long, distant memory.

    Thank you for your help!
    Maybe not so true in the USA, as the Beseler 23 (2" x 3" is about 6cm x 9cm) is a pretty common enlarger. Otherwise I'd say many people use a 4x5" enlarger to do 6x9. I think 6x9 is a great format but there are not a lot of 6x9 cameras out there. Which one do you have?

  6. #26
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,805
    6x9 was popular before 35mm became pervasive. Many inexpensive older enlargers were made in that size by Solar, Federal, and others. By now most have probably been trashed or converted to copy stands. Many may yet be hidden in attics. However, I'd prefer Omega or Besseler.

  7. #27
    Bill Burk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    3,230
    Images
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I've never seen one available. Where are you finding those?
    Of course Omega D negative carriers are fairly easy to modify / hacksaw / file. I use a Jeweler's saw.

    My 6x9 is a modified something else, probably used to be a 6x7

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Castle Rock, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,358
    Images
    58
    Ratty, last spring Laostyle17 and I bought an older 23C for $10, along with a bunch of darkroom accessories. It was in good enough shape that when I saw the seller a month ago he was wishing he hadn't sold it. It can take some time, but when you get back to the States, if you are patient, enlargers and darkroom equipment can be had for very little cash, or even given away to a good home.
    Last edited by pbromaghin; 11-05-2012 at 10:42 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Capitalization
    All paths are the same: they lead nowhere. Choose the one that has heart.

    Don Juan

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Los Alamos, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,052
    I've been using the same 23CII since 1971. They work. If you can find a good 4X5 enlarger for not too much more money, it will give you more flexibility and to opportunity to go LF if you want to. But be sure you can get a 6X9 negative carrier for it. They are definitely available for Beseler and Omega and are probably available most other major enlarger makers. You will probably need a new lens to cover the area. 105mm is standard for 6X9. 6X9 (or 2-1/4X3-1/4, if you prefer) is an interesting format. I've used it a lot in the past 30 years. It is the same as 35mm, only 6 time larger, with proportionally less grain and more detail. The negative size, like 35mm, doesn't correspond to any standard paper size, but the proportions are pleasing for many prints.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin