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  1. #11
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    One minor 'caveat': for left handers like myself, we like to work from right to left. - David Lyga

  2. #12

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    The "sliding glass door" might be a bit of a problem no? I'm a big fan of pocket doors in darkrooms. They're easy to light proof, take up no space and never get in the way. But glass? maybe not...

    Layout looks fantastic. I prefer working left to right in the darkroom, so the space left of the enlarger acts as a great staging area for paper safe or the pile of neg pages for proofing.

  3. #13
    snaggs's Avatar
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    Yes, the sliding door is the one problem. I'm going to see if a darkroom blind will work, but I wonder about the seal at floor level.

    I'm left handed, but since I'm converting a study with benches/draws only 3 years old, I'll have to make do. In the kitchen I tend to go left to right with my cooking, so we will see.

  4. #14

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    As I mentioned above the dowel sticks and blackout material have worked well for me for over 35 years. You could also consider the black plastic garden sheeting. I used that in a similar way to black out the two windows in my darkroom. It is pretty heavy and you could use a double layer. The nice thing is it can be placed or removed in a minute and when rolled up on the dowels like a scroll takes up little storage space. Make it long and wide enough to more than cover the door. The sides can be secured with self-stick Velcro.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  5. #15

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    My only concern about the corner is having enough room to slide a large easel to the left or right when the walls might get in the way with the easel back against the column base.
    Bob

  6. #16

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    How about attaching the enlarger to the back of the counter top or to the wall and cutting a square out of the counter top so you can lower the easel to multiple positions for bigger prints? This is featured in examples of home darkrooms shown in the Kodak darkroom construction book.
    All paths are the same: they lead nowhere. Choose the one that has heart.

    Don Juan

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