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  1. #1
    snaggs's Avatar
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    New darkroom, advise on my plan?

    Greetings, to start with I want to do B&W, 6x6 enlargements, max size 20"x20" in trays. I think I can just fit it in. I'm converting a study and already have this bench design in there. So I thought I'd loose a shelf and put in a wet bench.

    Any comments or advise? When I do colour one day in the future. I'll probably go Jobo CPP route. Theres not really much choice where the sink goes, the water is right behind the wall where the window is, so plumbing will be cheap.





    Daniel.

  2. #2

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    Looks excellent--- Since you are building in-- look at old photography books for such things as "dark drawers" for holding open paper, things like fan ducts and remember to use the vertical also --- lighting and high shelves.
    * Just because your eyes are closed, doesn't mean the lights in the darkroom are off. *
    * When the film you put in the camera is worth more than the camera you put the film in... *
    * When I started using 8x10, it amazed me how many shots were close to the car. *

  3. #3
    fotch's Avatar
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    Looks good. Like your 3D image.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  4. #4
    snaggs's Avatar
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    The cabinet guys did that for me when they designed the draws. I have a book called the "The Darkroom Handbook" by Michael Langford which has been great. I've already got draws, so I think I'll just reuse and leave the paper in the bag

    Daniel.
    Last edited by snaggs; 12-03-2012 at 09:08 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #5
    adelorenzo's Avatar
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    If you weren't planning on it I'd add a 2-3 foot high barrier between the enlarger and the wet area. Keep splashes of developer off your negatives and paper.

  6. #6

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    When I built my darkroom I had the sink designed to be somewhat deeper so as to prevent any splashes. Also it has three removable tops that can cover it and be at the same height as the counter ("L" shaped as your plans) to give extra counter surface when not in use as a sink. An exhaust fan system and canister water filter (if your water quality isn't the best such as well water). Plenty of well placed electrical outlets. Storage under the sink for chemicals, trays and stuff. Blackout system for the glass door. I placed "L" hooks above the door and attached blackout material to two dowel sticks one for the top and one for the bottom as a weight. I can roll it up and remove it when not needed.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  7. #7
    snaggs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelorenzo View Post
    If you weren't planning on it I'd add a 2-3 foot high barrier between the enlarger and the wet area. Keep splashes of developer off your negatives and paper.
    I was wondering what to do about that, I thought I'd use something temporary each time, like a chopping board wedged between two bookends or something.

    Daniel.

  8. #8
    snaggs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffreyg View Post
    When I built my darkroom I had the sink designed to be somewhat deeper so as to prevent any splashes. Also it has three removable tops that can cover it and be at the same height as the counter ("L" shaped as your plans) to give extra counter surface when not in use as a sink. An exhaust fan system and canister water filter (if your water quality isn't the best such as well water). Plenty of well placed electrical outlets. Storage under the sink for chemicals, trays and stuff. Blackout system for the glass door. I placed "L" hooks above the door and attached blackout material to two dowel sticks one for the top and one for the bottom as a weight. I can roll it up and remove it when not needed.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/
    Thanks Jerry. Because we have rainwater tanks, its compulsory here in Australia to have a water filter and UV treatment system. So particles are sorted. However, does the hardness of the water matter? As we are in a relatively dry coastal area.

    Daniel.

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    I am on well water that contains a lot of iron and calcium-carbonate and while we have a softener and filtration system I still have a canister filter in the line to my darkroom faucet.

    Jeff

  10. #10
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    Swing the enlarger 'round to the middle of the short bench so you have room to move. To operate an enlarger you need to be able to stand in front of it and be able to spread your arms out fully and keep the width encompassed by your hands clear. For 10x8" I keep lots of space

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