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  1. #11
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu
    That very narrow beam of light is almost as small as one
    of the infinite number of points which make up a plane.

    The trapezoidal method is a more real world method as
    it uses the carrier or a negative in the carrier and it's
    projected image to make the alignment.

    In a nut shell, a square in the carrier must project a
    square and it be in focus across the entire plane.

    Actually I think trapezoidal to be a misnomer. Dan
    Dan, with the laser you can move it around the baseboard to check that everything is aligned. I have never seen a difference as I have shifted it around. Remember, it you are perpendicular to one point on a plane you are perpendicular to all points on the plane.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by L Gebhardt
    Dan, with the laser you can move it
    around the baseboard to check that everything is aligned.
    I have never seen a difference as I have shifted it around.
    Remember, if you are perpendicular to one point on a plane
    you are perpendicular to all points on the plane.
    " ... if you are perpendicular ... " A first BIG IF in my book.
    I suppose it is assumed the ray is projected perpendicularly
    within some degree of manufactureing tolerance; the base
    of the tool, the insetting of the emitter, quality control
    allowances, etc.

    Using the trapezoidal method all I need are a square, ruler,
    and hand tools. The proof of good alignment is a square all
    corners image, sharp across the entirety of it's plane. Dan

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