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  1. #11

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    I have tried and failed to find a spooky photo I made like this years ago. The thing is that the light is diffused/blurred (whatever the correct term is?) into the dark areas - but because we are printing a negative it is the opposite way round to using a soft-filter or diffuser on the camera. Effectively the shadows 'eat' the light areas, if you do it to excess with a suitable contrasty neg it can look rather 'different'! :o)

  2. #12

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    I agree with the other comments . You can also make a diffuser by getting two pieces of thick glass and polish or tape the edges (no cut fingers) and place a small amount of baby oil between them adjust as needed. I have used this technique for some portraits and nudes where the model had a peeling sunburn and it was very effective. It keeps a generally focused look but softens some details probably by creating flare. you hold the glass under the enlarging lens and move it while in the focus mode until it looks right then repeat when projecting the image on to the paper.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  3. #13

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    Lots of very helpful ideas here -- several sound like things I can try with materials I have here at home. Wonderful! Thanks so much.

  4. #14
    EKDobbs's Avatar
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    I actually prefer to do this when my OOFE are sharp dots instead of smooth washes. Works pretty well, but it certainly takes some getting used to at first. The effect is very weak, at least with the cellophane trick.
    In other worlds he has
    darker days, blacker swells.
    Strokes that mix noir revenge
    on waves of grey.

  5. #15
    Stephen Frizza's Avatar
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    for a subtle yet interesting bleed of highlights and shaddow areas creating a softer focus you can burn in the area using anti newton glass. Or alternatively there is enlarger adapters which durst made where you can adjust to throw areas out of focus to re create depth of field issues it is a filter type device with panels of adjustable glass with optical properties that blur or soften focus in areas and is very controllable.
    "Its my profession to hijack time" ~ Stephen Frizza.

  6. #16

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    Dodge or mask the central subject and knock the enlarger so it vibrates.
    RJ

  7. #17

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    If you are using a glass carrier, you can simply smear a little vaseline or something like that on the top
    surface of the top glass and clean it afterwards, provided your enlarger does not run hot.

  8. #18

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    I'm a noob, so I have no idea whether this would work or not, but why not try exposing with the enlarger slightly out of focus, dodging the "sharp" part, then focus up and dodge the "soft" part?

    Thoughts those of you with some experience?

    EDIT: I see that i just resurrected a 2mo old post. Sorry bout that.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    No, you need to get it right in the camera.
    Extremely helpful piece of advice!
    Let me ask you something. If the rule you followed brought you to this, of what use was the rule?

    - Anton Chigurh

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Any of the suggested methods will never produce a natural out of focus blend, not to mention trying to make it repeatable. This is about camera control and proper application of DOF as one intends to have in the final picture. Call it learning from mistakes. Not meaning to be harsh, but fake is a fake.

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