Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,202   Posts: 1,531,602   Online: 1190
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    258
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Kodak made a B&W panchromatic paper that was processed as a normal B&W paper in Dektol or something similar.
    Panalure, wonderful stuff. There was also Ektamax, RA-4 process monochromatic paper, but I always found it greenish and somewhat flat. Or perhaps it was just very short shelf life. Harman's "Digital silver" papers are probably as close to Panalure as possible, but really expensive and come only in rolls.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,560
    You can also go the double-negative route. Contact or enlarge onto an appropriate black and white film
    to generate and interpositive (with appropriate filtration to null out the effect of the orange mask),
    then onto a second sheet of black and white film to generate your actual printing neg. This route has
    certain significant advantages in terms of tone or grain control, plus you can apply supplementary filtration to balance the scene just like in the field.

  3. #13
    bvy
    bvy is online now

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    837
    Images
    36
    As an aside, I saw Panalure on the shelf of our photography store here just last week. No prices, but the boxes were very old. The Kodabrome II next to it, equally old, was $269 for 250 8x10 sheets.

  4. #14
    David Lyga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,235
    Warning: Yes Panalure was truly a great paper. But...you cannot believe how short its life was. It did not age like other B&W papers. About 15 years ago I bought a box of 250 sheets (8X10) at a camera show and I immediately tested it. It was perfect with truly white whites. Then I put it away (at room temp) and only two years later I tested it again: almost total fog. This paper age-fogs rapidly so be warned about buying it now! - David Lyga

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    889
    Quote Originally Posted by bvy View Post
    As an aside, I saw Panalure on the shelf of our photography store here just last week. No prices, but the boxes were very old. The Kodabrome II next to it, equally old, was $269 for 250 8x10 sheets.
    I am astonished!! Do they seriously expect to sell the stuff, except to a museum or someone looking for period film-props?! By now it will be almost certainly unusable yet that Kodabrom price is almost the same as fresh Ilford Galerie.

  6. #16
    bvy
    bvy is online now

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    837
    Images
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by MartinP View Post
    I am astonished!! Do they seriously expect to sell the stuff, except to a museum or someone looking for period film-props?! By now it will be almost certainly unusable yet that Kodabrom price is almost the same as fresh Ilford Galerie.
    Astonishing, yes, but this shop has a reputation of sorts. On one occasion, I remember the price of a roll of Fuji Reala jumped two dollars between the time I called and the time I arrived (a couple hours). I only go there in a pinch.

  7. #17
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,486
    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    You can also go the double-negative route. Contact or enlarge onto an appropriate black and white film
    to generate and interpositive (with appropriate filtration to null out the effect of the orange mask),
    then onto a second sheet of black and white film to generate your actual printing neg. This route has
    certain significant advantages in terms of tone or grain control, plus you can apply supplementary filtration to balance the scene just like in the field.
    Not quite as in the field: you have to do it complementary.

  8. #18
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,187
    Images
    343
    Quote Originally Posted by bvy View Post
    Astonishing, yes, but this shop has a reputation of sorts. On one occasion, I remember the price of a roll of Fuji Reala jumped two dollars between the time I called and the time I arrived (a couple hours). I only go there in a pinch.
    Perhaps it was because they knew you were on your way?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,560
    Agx: yes, and you have to make sure your copy film is pan. If it's ortho or blue-sensitive, it will be largely blind to selective filtration, and that orange mask will equate to neutral density. There are a
    few tricks to this, but once learned, it's easy enough.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin