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  1. #11
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    I think projection prints should always be done with expert technique, even if the negative is from a Holga. I'd use a glass carrier and high quality enlarging lens.

  2. #12
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Printing Sprocket Holes

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Fisher View Post
    Go to the glass shop or hardware store and get two pieces of glass as worker suggested. It should cost a couple of bucks.
    Exactly what I did. Two pieces 6" x 6", edges sanded, cost $12.00.
    Randy S.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  3. #13
    bvy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Fisher View Post
    Go to the glass shop or hardware store and get two pieces of glass as worker suggested. It should cost a couple of bucks. If you want to mask, great, but you won't really need to. A little stray light isn't going to reduce the contrast noticeably on a holga (: All that said, try the med format carrier. It might make the edges less focussed, but is that really a big deal here? It may enhance the look you want. The best way to learn about photography isn't asking a bunch of people on the internet the best way to do something, but trying it yourself and seeing what happens......at least that is true for me!
    Okay -- I'll try the glass sandwich. I didn't quite understand the first time through. As far as asking questions, you're preaching to the choir. A little bit of research informs my experimentation. But your point is taken -- less talk and more action...

  4. #14

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    Don't forget to check that the flat pieces of glass, which are suggested, can replace the usual neg carrier without getting crunched or cracked by whatever mechanical arrangement positions and locates the standard carrier.

    If there are grooves or castings to line-up with grooves in the normal (often alloy or steel) carrier then they would need to be safe for bearing down on the glass too. Some enlargers use the weight of the lamphouse to hold the neg-carrier securely and might crack the glass if the pressure is not evenly supported.

  5. #15
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Exception to the rule, you can take a sharp negative and create a unique pictorial effect with a simple lens at the enlarger.

    I have two shots, 4x5 prints, from a Ricohflex TLR where I printed using a simple lens and the mood is awesome. Note, I used crisp borders, and no edge markings for the prints, so there was no telltale sign of lousy optics. I always blamed the camera for the soft edges, until I found the original negatives which are sharp as a tack (relatively considering the character of Ricohflex optics).

  6. #16
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvy View Post
    Okay -- I'll try the glass sandwich. I didn't quite understand the first time through.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinP View Post
    Don't forget to check that the flat pieces of glass, which are suggested, can replace the usual neg carrier without getting crunched or cracked by whatever mechanical arrangement positions and locates the standard carrier.

    If there are grooves or castings to line-up with grooves in the normal (often alloy or steel) carrier then they would need to be safe for bearing down on the glass too. Some enlargers use the weight of the lamphouse to hold the neg-carrier securely and might crack the glass if the pressure is not evenly supported.
    Yes! Careful! My Beseler's stage is flat and only held shut only by spring pressure. My Omega's stage is held shut by the weight of the lamphouse and condenser. It's heavy! If I let the stage close •S•L•O•W•L•Y• it's all right. If I let the springs snap or the condenser come crashing down it WILL shatter the glass.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  7. #17
    bvy
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    Thanks, worker. One question: In your diagram, are you applying tape directly to the film? I hadn't thought of that. (Certainly it's not the emulsion side...)

    I believe my Omega (like yours) uses the weight of the head/lamp to hold the carrier in place. I'll heed your words of caution!

  8. #18
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Use tape at your discretion. The emulsion would be face down on the glass so the tape would only contact the base.

    If you don't think you need it, don't use it. If you do need it use drafting tape or Permatex or similar. I suppose painter's tape would work in a pinch.
    I wouldn't use Scotch tape or ordinary masking tape.

    The way I drew it was just for purpose of illustration. Locate the tape where you think it best. Maybe only on the edges.

    I've done it on the Beseler a couple of times. No problem there. Just close the gate slowly.
    I've only tested it on the Omega. I seriously cringed as I lowered the lamp onto the glass... slowly... but it does work. Just be damn careful!

    Just thought of this: Maybe, you could use a donut of cardboard or poster board between the top sheet of glass and the lamp/condenser to act as padding.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by Worker 11811; 03-25-2013 at 09:04 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

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