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  1. #101

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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Noble View Post
    That's an odd way of limiting detail. B&W film tends to be finer grain and have higher resolution... perfect for recording detail.
    One enduring description of B&W is that it is "timeless". IMO part of the reason for that is that the detail of color is omitted.
    You've misunderstood the use of the word "detail" in the context of this conversation. I don't know what to say about your opinion of the timelessness of color photographs. I guess everyone is entitled to their opinion.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    Only half my brain agrees with you, Mark.... namely the half that I use when taking and printing black and white. But within seconds I can switch gears and think in a color mode which can be just as "timeless". I think you have a very limited perspective of what color is capable of,
    perhaps based on unworthy stereotypes. I think the drawings in Lascaux about as timeless as manmade images can be. ... they used color didn't they?
    I did not coin the idea of timeless, classic is another word regularly used, there are other ways to say that too. These are mainstream commercial discriptions, not necessarily my sensibility or definition.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Ana´s Nin

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noble View Post
    You've misunderstood the use of the word "detail" in the context of this conversation. I don't know what to say about your opinion of the timelessness of color photographs. I guess everyone is entitled to their opinion.
    I think Noble, that in the grand context of 35mm photography, you are being overly specific.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Ana´s Nin

  4. #104

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    Mark - anything allegedly "mainstream" is conceptually for those who can't think for themselves. Such stereotypes deserve to be ignored,
    though in this case, I think you are completely mistaken in the first place.

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    Mark - anything allegedly "mainstream" is conceptually for those who can't think for themselves. Such stereotypes deserve to be ignored,
    though in this case, I think you are completely mistaken in the first place.
    If the audience/market/gallery owners understand the "timeless/classic/whatever" thought there's probably something to it.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Ana´s Nin

  6. #106

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    Color photography has been "mainstream" in the haute gallery and museum context ever since the 70's. If anything, it's black and white work
    that is considered passe nowadays and endangered, unless it's some auction setting dealing in vintage work by a handful of famous names.
    But it's all just a stupid game. Do what you enjoy and do it well, and don't worry what a few half-educated idiots think, who probably can't take
    or print work half as good anyway. I don't know just when I get back in the game, publicly at least, maybe in a couple more years... but I've
    certainly never had anyone in a serious gallery or public venue setting discriminate between one piece or another based on whether it was color black and white. I do both. They appreciate both. The potential market or venue will vary with the individual, of course. And I don't have either time or patience for any little-league types pontificating about such matters.... they should stick to selling designer corndogs.

  7. #107
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    Yes passÚ is probably another word for Classic.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Ana´s Nin

  8. #108

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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    I think Noble, that in the grand context of 35mm photography, you are being overly specific.
    I know you are confusing the word "detail" with "characteristic." I have never walked into a photography store and been told a film has more "detail" simply because it is color. That is a very idiosyncratic use of the word "detail." Which of course you are entailed to do. It's a free country. But that has nothing to do with this thread. When people ask me whether I am shooting color or B&W I am not going to say I am shooting the film with more "detail" to indicate I am shooting color. That would make me sound like a moron. I won't do it. Sorry.

  9. #109
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    Noble I really doubt that a fashion designer, art director, make-up artist, painter, or a mom with bad ass camera would be confused by me referring to the colors in a setting, or of a dress, or on a cheek as details, in a photo or in a studio. I.E. "That red is a great detail"

    Photographers looking to figure out how they can do something, aficionados of formats larger than 35mm, and the infamous pixel peepers are typical of those who care, most of the rest of the world doesn't care, as long as the photo catches and holds their/our interest.

    Sure fine detail (as you define it) with little to no grain can be a great characteristic in a photo that draws the viewer in, but so can the detail of variation in color in a portrait of a rose or Tulip. A local buddy of mine does color work where the detail is mostly about color and shape and almost never about sharp in focus edges. http://fineartamerica.com/featured/o...t-bridges.html
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Ana´s Nin

  10. #110

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    That's quite an informative link, Mark. It reminds me of one night when a little mouse got into my backpack and ate a whole bag of colored M&M's all by himself - maybe twice his body weight. My pack was leaning against a big log, and the next morning there were colored blotches of mouse barf up and down that entire log. I think that little rodent had more color finesse than what that link illustrates.



 

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