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  1. #131
    clayne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noble View Post
    This was addressed earlier in the thread. Unless you have razor wire around a photograph in a museum or gallery people will invariable walk up to it. Now if something is on a bill board 100 feet in the air and you are driving by it at 55 mph then yes you are 100% correct.
    Okay so contact your 35mm prints so no one can possibly perceive any grain regardless of how close they go.

    Or realize that it's up to the viewer ultimately and if they want to diminish the experience by staring at any grain then that's they're problem. It does not obviate printing at some nebulous "no visible grain" enlargement size.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  2. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noble View Post
    This was addressed earlier in the thread. Unless you have razor wire around a photograph in a museum or gallery people will invariable walk up to it. Now if something is on a bill board 100 feet in the air and you are driving by it at 55 mph then yes you are 100% correct.
    So what if the viewer can walk up to the print, doesn't mean I "need" to give them a reason to.

    I have a few paintings my mom did way back when, beatiful, simple, low detail. The only thing gained by getting real close is the ability to see the brush strokes. Only a brush stroke style snob/geek would care.

    Similarly I also have a nice watercolor by a local guy, fun piece, same as my mom's painting though, get close and all you see is craftwork, not the art.

    Quilter's at the county fair, same game. The aficionados count stitches, the rest of the world looks at the pattern.

    This theme plays out over and over and over in the visual arts, in my experience, when people move in real close they are typically trying to judge or learn the craft, many times ignoring the intent of the art itself.

    I see little point in pandering to students of the medium/craft, except when at a class or seminar or similar function, they simply aren't the normal audience for my shots.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #133

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    Heck ... I once spent two hours nose to nose with a Vermeer in the National Gallery, another hour nose to nose looking at Rembrandt's impasto
    technique. I wasn't much interested in their famed collection of Medieval miniaturists, but then there's Van Gogh, where he seemed obsessed
    of every single brushstroke ... and brush masters like Dali who could could put incredible detail on a canvas. So yeah if, it it's there....

  4. #134
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    Heck ... I once spent two hours nose to nose with a Vermeer in the National Gallery, another hour nose to nose looking at Rembrandt's impasto
    technique. I wasn't much interested in their famed collection of Medieval miniaturists, but then there's Van Gogh, where he seemed obsessed
    of every single brushstroke ... and brush masters like Dali who could could put incredible detail on a canvas. So yeah if, it it's there....
    I rest my case.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #135

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    Well, Mark... the general public who has no interest in technique will get their noses into my prints every single time. And I get right up to a
    Rothko painting just like I would an Impressionist, because the technique warrants it, even though there might not be any obvious detail. Only
    from someone like Mondrian or Motherwell will I back away, because I detest all the tape lines and overpainted creases. I once displayed beside Motherwell, and it's interesting how people would approach my prints and back away from his paintings. ... and it had nothing to do with the overall composition... they could take that in as well. Vermeer was almost a miniaturist, and you miss 90% if you don't get close. Rembrandt
    comes alive when you see all the little impasto gold buttons of paint sparkle in his self-portrait.. even though in a book or printed reproduction the same image gives a so-so thud ... his genius was to bring you into the composition. With VanGogh you want to feel the impassioned intensity he put into every single brushstroke - something no counterfeiter has ever been able to do, no matter how analogous
    the overall subject was. I have people who have owned one of my prints for decades and then will suddenly discover something new. It's
    quite rewarding as a printer to embed those rich layers of content. For those who can't appreciate it ... well, they can shop at Ikea!

  6. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    I once displayed beside Motherwell, and it's interesting how people would approach my prints and back away from his paintings. ...
    You must be very important.
    Kick his ass, Sea Bass!

  7. #137
    Guillaume Zuili's Avatar
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    It's funny. I look for grain instead of being afraid of :-)
    The more the better, and it's absolutely beautiful when you look up close.

    If you know how to print what you want at the size you want there is no limitation.
    The most important first is to get a good picture. Then you do whatever you feel.
    You do it and you don't listen to others's opinion. It's very often a waste of time.

  8. #138
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Guillaume, it is always an inspiration to me seeing your work.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan R View Post
    This is a crazy discussion, although I'll confess that I haven't read it all. If you go to an exhibition of Cartier Bresson's photos, what size do you expect them to be? 10 x 8? Of course not.They'll be 20 x 16, despite the famously poor negative quality. But they look terrific, because the photo itself a rich print are everything.
    I have been to an exhibit of CB. Print sizes ranged from considerable smaller than 8x10 printed on 8x10 paper up to perhaps 16x20. Most were probably about 11x14.

  10. #140
    Guillaume Zuili's Avatar
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    Roger,
    It simply doesn't mean anything. The vast majority of small "vintage" prints were simply Press prints that were sent to magazines and newspapers and never returned.
    As for HCB. There was a dedicated printer for HCB at Picto Bastille. His only job was to go to the vault, take a neg and print. Being there many times myself in the dark for my shows. I can assure you he was not making small prints. Printing the same negs for what 30+ years ? He could do it eyes closed



 

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