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  1. #11
    cliveh's Avatar
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    I find that slightly thin negatives print better on a condenser, than a diffuser. However, it may be that you need to produce a slightly denser negative in order to treat the cause of your problem rather than the effect.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  2. #12
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Neutral density filtration between the light source and the negative. I don't know if your enlarger allows for that. But large ND sheets are terribly inexpensive if it does. This has worked well for me in the past.

    I cut out a set of 1-, 2-, and 3-stop custom filters. In various combinations they allowed me to stay near or right at my preferred enlarging lens aperture, while still giving me my preferred exposure time length for comfortable dodging and burning.

    Ken
    "Hate is an adolescent term used to stop discussion with people you disagree with. You can do better than that."
    —'blanksy', December 13, 2013

  3. #13
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    this will work great as well, Lee Filters or Roscoe filters sell them cheap, just try to keep them above the lens and a distance from the neg.
    the bulb will burn them if they are too close.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    Neutral density filtration between the light source and the negative. I don't know if your enlarger allows for that. But large ND sheets are terribly inexpensive if it does. This has worked well for me in the past.

    I cut out a set of 1-, 2-, and 3-stop custom filters. In various combinations they allowed me to stay near or right at my preferred enlarging lens aperture, while still giving me my preferred exposure time length for comfortable dodging and burning.

    Ken

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    Neutral density filtration between the light source and the negative. I don't know if your enlarger allows for that. But large ND sheets are terribly inexpensive if it does. This has worked well for me in the past.

    I cut out a set of 1-, 2-, and 3-stop custom filters. In various combinations they allowed me to stay near or right at my preferred enlarging lens aperture, while still giving me my preferred exposure time length for comfortable dodging and burning.

    Ken
    I think this is exactly the direction I'll move in. Any suggestions on where to get some sheets of this inexpensively. The search I did kept returning things in the $100 range.

  5. #15
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    It's the rolls that are in the USD $100 range. Here's an individual 21x24-inch sheet of 1-stop ND for only USD $5.89.

    The shipping will likely exceed the cost of the sheet, so buy several densities at once.

    Ken
    Last edited by Ken Nadvornick; 08-30-2013 at 05:30 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Replaced computer language with human language...
    "Hate is an adolescent term used to stop discussion with people you disagree with. You can do better than that."
    —'blanksy', December 13, 2013

  6. #16

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    It sounds as if you established the correct time, presumably with test strips but without filtration and then dialled in Y&M to give you the correct grade.

    If 4 secs was correct without filtration then you dialled in filtration using the same time I am surprised that the final print and test strip didn't appear different. Any filtration will increase the time required to get the same looking print as the test strip.

    If 4 secs looked right on the test trip without filtration then with filtration I'd have expected the print to be underexposed and look lighter.

    pentaxuser

  7. #17
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    OP, since you have the color head don't forget that you can use the C/M/Y filters in combination to alter both the contrast and lower the light level. You can increase the Cyan, adjust the mix of M+Y, or both together. Here's a thread from another site that addresses the issue:
    http://www.largeformatphotography.in...p/t-76355.html

  8. #18
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Yes equal amounts of cyan Magenta and yellow create nuetral density. the issue would be then if the OP wants to split print and use maximum magenta for the higher contrast.
    If so screwing around with all the dials would be an issue also if the top of the enlarger is not braced with wall mounts.
    Quote Originally Posted by martinjames View Post
    OP, since you have the color head don't forget that you can use the C/M/Y filters in combination to alter both the contrast and lower the light level. You can increase the Cyan, adjust the mix of M+Y, or both together. Here's a thread from another site that addresses the issue:
    http://www.largeformatphotography.in...p/t-76355.html

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie View Post
    Yes equal amounts of cyan Magenta and yellow create nuetral density. the issue would be then if the OP wants to split print and use maximum magenta for the higher contrast.
    If so screwing around with all the dials would be an issue also if the top of the enlarger is not braced with wall mounts.

    I just tried a quick session in the darkroom and ended thinking I just need to stop and wait until I get the ND filters. I don't know how to use the CMY to control both density AND contrast.

    Bob- I've been looking a lot at your thread that's the sticky here. I take it you use under the lens filters, I'm slightly puzzled how you juggle switching from one filter to the other mid print time sequence? This may be a little OT here but since filtration's getting involved...

    Thanks so much for everyone's help.

    John

  10. #20
    eddie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mexipike View Post
    I'm slightly puzzled how you juggle switching from one filter to the other mid print time sequence?
    John- You do two exposure times. One with the #0, and another with the #4.

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