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  1. #11

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    Plus one for the other suggestions. Fortunately I haven't needed to remove a black spot for quite some time but in addition to the scalpel method it would be handy to have some Dremel burs and stones (or get some dental ones from your dentist). They work well for abrading with a light touch. Practice on a throw away print. Spotting when the emulsion has been removed might result in a more obvious black spot.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  2. #12
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Quick question to Ian and all..

    I have not selenium toned the prints yet, should I tone after knifing or does it matter???

  3. #13
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    You should do it after toning etc once the print's dry.

    Ian

  4. #14
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    Thanks Ian

    I will give it a go.

    Bob
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    You should do it after toning etc once the print's dry.

    Ian

  5. #15
    ROL
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    I second the etching technique as the best archival of a lot of bad alternatives. However, the unavoidable resulting emulsion breaks, though not much better by bleaching, visible at angles on glossy papers absolutely gives me the shivers on an otherwise "perfect" print. So much so that I have thrown out entire runs of otherwise fine prints to reprint them if the problem was not on the negative itself (i.e., during enlarging). One of a kind, hand made prints ...ahem .

  6. #16
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    I am between a rock and a hard place on this one, just got the knife, got to keep it away from my throat if I screw up.
    Quote Originally Posted by ROL View Post
    I second the etching technique as the best archival of a lot of bad alternatives. However, the unavoidable resulting emulsion breaks, though not much better by bleaching, visible at angles on glossy papers absolutely gives me the shivers on an otherwise "perfect" print. So much so that I have thrown out entire runs of otherwise fine prints to reprint them if the problem was not on the negative itself (i.e., during enlarging). One of a kind, hand made prints ...ahem .

  7. #17

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    My cats are white, with white hair, so do you recommend an alternative technique?

  8. #18

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    Google "Lugols Solution". A mixture of iodine and iodide. Apply to hair line or black spot with a fine brush,on the dry print. Rinse and re-fix to clear the brown stain. Bleaches back to paper base white.
    It works very well.

  9. #19

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    Clarification..

    Just checked my notes -the above procedure is for a wet print, excess water swabbed off.
    To use on a dry print,clear the stain with a 10% solution of Thiourea,and wipe off with Methylated Spirits.

  10. #20
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ROL View Post
    I second the etching technique as the best archival of a lot of bad alternatives. However, the unavoidable resulting emulsion breaks, though not much better by bleaching, visible at angles on glossy papers absolutely gives me the shivers on an otherwise "perfect" print. So much so that I have thrown out entire runs of otherwise fine prints to reprint them if the problem was not on the negative itself (i.e., during enlarging). One of a kind, hand made prints ...ahem .
    This is why you use a gummed envelope (not the self sealing type) and after knifing the hair repair the surface by dissolving a small amount of the gum in a drop of water and applying with a fine brush. As with all retouching working too hard to remove an imperfection can make it worse a light touch is needed.

    Steaming the surface of a print will also lessen the effects of a retouching knife.

    Ian

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