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  1. #1
    jcc
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    This tried to do everything to NOT get printed!

    I started out with Porta 160, for an hour-long exposure. Fine and dandy. Then I got home, and accidentally developed it with BW chemistry and temperature with ISO 400 film (was shooting with 3 different films during the trip, but stored exposed sheets in one box, and got mixed up in the dark — notches felt similar). Upon realizing my bumbling mistake, and letting out some expletives, I proceeded to hang the film to dry. The sheet slipped off the clothes pin and landed emulsion-side down on the gritty concrete — more expletives were unleashed. Needless to say, the film had way too much density — I couldn't even scan it! I went ahead and tried to print through it anyway. After 192 sec. at f/5.6, it finally made it to a 9"x6" print, and here it is:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Has anyone else made a similar fumble before?

  2. #2
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    It's unique! Sometimes these kinds of mistakes lead to something fun or new.

    My story is not as interesting, but I just developed a roll of 135 FP4+ where most of the frames were blown out because the aperture blades on my lens were sticking. Last night on a whim I picked the most dense frame and tried to print it. A 5x7 print, it needed 50s green and 35s blue for a split grade print at f/2.8 -- and it probably could have used a little more high contrast blue exposure. A normal 5x7 print for my setup is around 20s green and 5s blue at f/8 ( my cold light is very blue. ) The result was grainy and not very nice, especially compared to yours, but it was a print. I was just amazed it was even possible to focus the enlarger. Some of the other frames will be out of focus from using hyperfocal and then not getting a small aperture, but I'll try to print a few more.

  3. #3
    jcc
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    Quote Originally Posted by NedL View Post
    ... The result was grainy and not very nice...
    I have had the same as what you described with 135 film. That's why I didn't really want to enlarge this one as much.

  4. #4
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    This thread of mine might be useful to you; there's a link to a Kodak PDF wherein you can bleach and redevelop the film and get it back to colour without the insane density. I haven't tried it yet.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcc View Post
    I started out with Porta 160, for an hour-long exposure. Fine and dandy. Then I got home, and accidentally developed it with BW chemistry and temperature with ISO 400 film (was shooting with 3 different films during the trip, but stored exposed sheets in one box, and got mixed up in the dark — notches felt similar).
    I get much better results when I use the C-41 process on Kodak Porta rather than Black & White chemistry. YMMV
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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    That looks like a good picture to me, despite all the goofs. Well composed and with pretty good contrast. I especially like the glow around the tallest skyscraper in the photo.
    ME Super

    Shoot more film.
    There are eight ways to put a slide into a projector tray. Seven of them are wrong.

  7. #7

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    hi jcc

    i have had similar problems but not the same.
    many years ago i used to coat LARGE glass plates with
    liquid light and coat the plate with gunk, then reapply liquid light
    to various places and print more, you know, like a collage ..
    then i would make a contact print of the glass plate .
    one day, after recoating my best plate and having it sleep on the edge of my darkroom sink ...
    it fell on the floor and shattered to a million pieces.
    some were attached to eachother because of the emulsion, some because of the collodion or albumen, or rubber cement
    or varnish or urethane or whatever else i painted the pane with ...
    i picked a few pieces up, shook my head and said a few choice words to myself ( and outloud )
    and then stuck a few shards into the head of my enlarger and began printing them ... it helped me turn the corner ...
    i still have some pieces i take out once in a while they are hidden in an old 4x5 film box i have mixed in with my film
    so i randomly find it ...

    drastic problems lead to new things sometimes ..

    i hope you have the same troubles again and next time STEP on the film when its on the concrete

    nice photograph btw !
    john
    im empty, good luck

  8. #8
    jcc
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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    This thread of mine might be useful to you; there's a link to a Kodak PDF wherein you can bleach and redevelop the film and get it back to colour without the insane density. I haven't tried it yet.
    Thanks for the link. The PDF is promising! I hope it also works for selenium-toned negatives (as thi. I might give it a shot on another sheet before I do it with this one.

  9. #9
    jcc
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    I get much better results when I use the C-41 process on Kodak Porta rather than Black & White chemistry. YMMV
    That would have been the easier route.

  10. #10
    jcc
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    hi jcc

    i have had similar problems but not the same.
    many years ago i used to coat LARGE glass plates with
    liquid light and coat the plate with gunk, then reapply liquid light
    to various places and print more, you know, like a collage ..
    then i would make a contact print of the glass plate .
    one day, after recoating my best plate and having it sleep on the edge of my darkroom sink ...
    it fell on the floor and shattered to a million pieces.
    some were attached to eachother because of the emulsion, some because of the collodion or albumen, or rubber cement
    or varnish or urethane or whatever else i painted the pane with ...
    i picked a few pieces up, shook my head and said a few choice words to myself ( and outloud )
    and then stuck a few shards into the head of my enlarger and began printing them ... it helped me turn the corner ...
    i still have some pieces i take out once in a while they are hidden in an old 4x5 film box i have mixed in with my film
    so i randomly find it ...

    drastic problems lead to new things sometimes ..

    i hope you have the same troubles again and next time STEP on the film when its on the concrete

    nice photograph btw !
    john
    You just gave me a brilliant idea!!!

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