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  1. #11

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    Hi darkosaric, i will post some links that have helped me very much concerning split grade printing.

    It all started with an old forum post here on apug.

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum41/4...-sequence.html

    page 3 has a post by bob carnie (post #26) explaining in detail a similar, but different approach.
    here is les mcleans very well detailed with photo examples approach

    http://www.lesmcleanphotography.com/...ull&article=21

    ^ this one is awesome, it has helped me out so much.

    The difference between that and what i do, is i use 1/3 or 1/4 of a sheet of paper. when i use a 0 filter, and when i use a 5 filter. After i pick a combination, i do a whole print as stated, followed by a hopefully final print that is dodged and burned.

    While i became proficient at guessing which filter i needed, with what times, the above method almost ensures, that you won't waste more than 3 (4 if you mess up) sheets of paper.

  2. #12

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  3. #13

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    Your basic approach is OK. There are several fine books on printing. The most readily available is probably Adams, "The Print." The point made about making test prints at the final size is well taken. Various things, like flare, affect the exposure and contrast, so you will probably actually save paper by starting full sized. Adams recommends determining the exposure using a low contrast filter or paper (0 or 1). Determine what exposure will print the highlights correctly. Make test strips on the full width of the paper, and don't use a lot of steps - 4 is fine. Your eyes are pretty good at interpolation, and you will make adjustments anyway. (I usually use a Kodak Projection Print Scale, which is easy and works decently well.) When you think you know the exposure, make a print at low contrast, and adjust the exposure from there accordingly. Then adjust the contrast to print the shadows correctly. Then fine tune with dodging and burning in. Then further adjust the contrast, exposure, and manipulation until you get what you want. A lot of time and paper to the first really good print. Mostly it just takes practice.

  4. #14
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    Thank you all once more .

  5. #15
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    I used yesterday some Adox vario classic (triple paper weight - it is great paper!) - and I used combination 0 filter + 5 filter. Results are promising: after testing it looks like my "problematic" high contrast negatives are printing best with 90% exposure time with 0 filter and 10% of exposure time with 5 filter. With some additional burning (without filter) and dodging - it was not so hard as I expected.

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