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  1. #31
    eclarke's Avatar
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    I take my glasses off and ignore it. If the subject matter doen't supercede the dust, it's a loser.

  2. #32

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    After a final rinse in distilled water with a drop of photo-flow, I hang my negatives to dry the the shower stall in my basement bathroom. Being a basement and a floor to ceiling tiled stall, it's humid enough that dust is not a problem on the negatives. I haven't used my enlarger in a while, but when I do I'll set it up in the same bathroom, where I assume the dust situation will be manageable.

    My scanner, on the other, is near my desk, which is very close to the laundry. The clothes dryer is a dust generation machine so it's a big challenge to keep the dust down. I've had some success by building a plastic tent around the scanner and hanging a damp cloth in it to raise the humidity and reduce the dust . There is a limit, I assume, to the level of humidity and the proper functioning of sensitive electronics - I haven't hit it. Yet.
    Louis
    (Paladin1420)

  3. #33

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    I try to cut and sleeve my negatives in Print File pages as soon as the negative strip is dry. This avoids the strip picking up excess dust while drying. Any dust issues I have are minor especially considering working in a laundry room that doubles as a darkroom. I have found that if a negative strip gets dusty while drying, it can be very difficult to keep spots to a minimum while enlarging (especially with 35mm negatives).

  4. #34
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loren Sattler View Post
    I try to cut and sleeve my negatives in Print File pages as soon as the negative strip is dry. This avoids the strip picking up excess dust while drying. Any dust issues I have are minor especially considering working in a laundry room that doubles as a darkroom. I have found that if a negative strip gets dusty while drying, it can be very difficult to keep spots to a minimum while enlarging (especially with 35mm negatives).
    Agreed, I saw someone say they don't use a wetting agent and it takes them a whole day to dry their film, it takes me a max of 2 hours and I hang mine in my shower...

    Give that stuff a try, no squeegee just hang to drip dry.


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    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  5. #35
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    I have very little dust in my basement darkroom even though I do some woodworking in the basement. I think there are two things that make a big difference. I have a heavy duty ventiliation fan (Panasonic....mounts remotely) that blows through a HEPA filter into my darkroom providing positive pressure. The second thing I have is a film cleaner off of a Fuji Frontier printer otherwise known as the Kinetronic static vac. I found one on ebay for $50 or so.....best $50 I ever spent. After using that, I still look at the neg before putting it in the enlarger and blow off any remaining dust with canned air. Yeah, I hate spotting.
    Your first 10,000 pictures are the worst - HCB

    www.markjamesfisher.com

  6. #36

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    Sloppy is as sloppy does. Why even bother buying a nice camera and expensive lenses if you let your cat cough up hairballs in the darkroom,
    and if you think your "image" is so "important" that it will be miraculously enhanced by all kinds of technical flaws. Or maybe you just happen
    to love endless hours of spotting. Check out any cleanroom catalog or website. I use triple filtered air lines, plus a true HEPA vac (not one of those Cheapo Depot things), plus an electrostatic industrial air cleaner, plus a 100% dacron cleanroom smock, plus enameled walls, etc etc etc. And the whole nine yards probably cost less than another fancy lens which I didn't need anyway.

  7. #37
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Jeez, Drew, you are way beyond my budget and what I can afford. Those of us that do this on a shoestring budget don't exactly have a choice.

    My darkroom is a corner of our unfinished basement, so not a separate room. It is a combined space for wood working, fixing things, laundry, storage, and also where my furnace and water heater are located.
    Funny thing is, in most 16x20 prints from 35mm I rarely have more than a handful dust spots. That's 16x enlargement roughly.

    Good enough for me. I don't have any hepa filters or special smocks, and vacuum once every six months. If I came into some extra cash I would make it warmer there. In the winter the room is about 45 degrees.

    You are far from the norm, Drew. You are one of the lucky few.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #38

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    I started out with the enlarger in a carpeted bedroom and a cheap roller drum in a spare bathroom, and managed to plug a one-man show of
    20X24 Cibachromes, which are basically unretouchable. So I've paid my dues and know what hell is. A cleanroom smocks costs about thirty
    bucks; but merely avoiding linty cotton clothing in the darkroom helps. Sponge down surfaces and walls. A simple household circulating air
    cleaner will help - and those things cost very little too. But woodworking in the same space is really pushing your luck.

  9. #39
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    I started out with the enlarger in a carpeted bedroom and a cheap roller drum in a spare bathroom, and managed to plug a one-man show of
    20X24 Cibachromes, which are basically unretouchable. So I've paid my dues and know what hell is. A cleanroom smocks costs about thirty
    bucks; but merely avoiding linty cotton clothing in the darkroom helps. Sponge down surfaces and walls. A simple household circulating air
    cleaner will help - and those things cost very little too. But woodworking in the same space is really pushing your luck.
    Drew, your next challenge, a combined woodworking, down comforter making, Sheetrock producing factory that also makes and develops film ... Hehe


    Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  10. #40
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    But woodworking in the same space is really pushing your luck.
    And strangely I get almost spot free 16x enlargements...
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

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