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Thread: More contrast

  1. #1
    Sjixxxy's Avatar
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    More contrast

    I have a few negatives I want to print that are a bit thin. I can get usuable images from them with a 5 VC filter, but would like to get a little more punch in the contrast. What are my options for doing this? I'm thinking selenium intensification of the negative may help a bit? What other techniques are out there?
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  2. #2

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    what about making an internegative?

    you could probably control the contrast a bit more?
    Last edited by Christopher Colley; 02-03-2005 at 05:50 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: more precise
    "Where is beauty? Where I must will with my whole Will; where I will love and perish, that an image may not remain merely an image."

  3. #3
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
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    You could also try local bleaching on the prints. Farmers reducer at double strength, I think.

  4. #4

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    Dear Zeropoint,

    You may want to try selenium toning the negatives.

    Neal Wydra

  5. #5
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    Hi there Sjixxxy,

    Good timing on this post...I just selenium intensified a problematic (thin) negative a couple days ago and got great results.

    I always doubted the examples shown in Ansel's, The Negative, thinking that the difference shown must be an exaggeration in the printing of the book...but it's not! I had two negatives of the same scene (one compositionally weak, the other one of my best...both images screwed up in the same way I'm embarassed to say). I tested the procedure a tad differently than Ansel described it, refixing in TF-3 alkaline fixer, then toning for five minutes in a 1:2 solution (using water). I made prints of both negatives prior to toning at max-black time, then re-printed the test negative at max-black time after toning. There was a marked difference, but not enough for the other negative. I gave it 6 minutes...it now prints beautifully (for a work print) at normal contrast settings at max-black time.

    One thing I was surprised about was how the shadows were effected. While there was no real difference in the print values around I and II, the higher values within the shadow textures were raised...lifted...revealed...opened.

    Murray

  6. #6
    blackmelas's Avatar
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    What about a high contrast paper developer? I've only recently tried Tetenal's Dokumol developer and I could get about one grade over and above Ilford's multigrade but I wasn't trying it ith a thin negative. Does any one know if there would be problems with this method, say sacrificing tonality?
    Best regards,
    James

  7. #7

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    I'd be tempted to lith print for continuous tone. Dan

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    You might tweak your print developer with some carbonate and potassium bromide soloution. Same idea as using a high contrast developer, no potential damage to the neg, if it doesnt work, nothing lost.

  9. #9
    Loose Gravel's Avatar
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    If you were using a standard 5 filter, you might try adding a blue filter to it. Like a 47 tricolor or some blue lighting gel. Or maybe just the 47 alone. This can get you a little more bang from your photon.
    Watch for Loose Gravel

  10. #10
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    The advantage of "correcting" the negative, is that subsequent prints can be made on or close to grade 2 in paper contrast...dodging, burning...everything becomes easier.

    Murray



 

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