Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,536   Posts: 1,544,190   Online: 862
      
Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 52
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Shanghai, China
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,949
    Images
    38

    Home Printing: How large?

    Just curious, but how large a print can your typical home printing dark room make? I'm currently shooting 6 x 7 negatives for home printing later when I can get a dark room set up. I'm wondering how large I'll be able to make these negatives without super special equipment.

    Thanks!

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Slovenia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    747
    Images
    9
    I use to print up to 12x16 but prefer to print much smaller now, 4x6, 5x7, and 18x24 cm (a bit smaller than 8x10 inch).

  3. #3
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,732
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    Just curious, but how large a print can your typical home printing dark room make? I'm currently shooting 6 x 7 negatives for home printing later when I can get a dark room set up. I'm wondering how large I'll be able to make these negatives without super special equipment.

    Thanks!
    I have 4 enlargers and can get to 16x20 inches on the baseboard of 3 of them, 11x14 on the little one.

    Three of the enlargers can reorient themselves so as to project across the room, at that point the limits start being the brightness of the enlarger and the size of the room so...

    On a more practical note, how you develop the sheets is a significant limit too. For example if you use trays you gotta have someplace to put the trays. 8x10 trays are easy, but a single 16x20 tray takes up the same space as all 4 8x10 trays.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #4
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,270
    Images
    148
    I've printed 30"x242 images in the past in my old darkroom, the enlargers wer bench mounted although the top of the bench was moveable to allow larger than 20"x16" prints. ( It slotted in a different heights down to 2" from the floor.

    I now have a floor standing De Vere 5108 and that allows similar large enlargements as the base board can be dropped.

    Ian

  5. #5
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,276
    Images
    12
    16x20 is reasonable IMHO if you do drum development - I print in my CPP2 and can do 16x20 with ease. I could buy a bigger drum and do 20x24, but there's $300+ right there and I can't be bothered just yet. Your enlarger should definitely go to 16x20; the limiting factor will be processing space, especially if you use trays.

    dev+stop+fix+fix+wash is a LOT of space if every tray is 17x21" or bigger. Stacking trays saves room, but you need to get a big wet floppy bit of paper between trays without scratching the surface or crinkling it in the slightest.

    95% of my prints are 8x10 though. I buy that by the 250-box and use them to paper my walls at work, then they go in archival boxes for storage. The occasional Really Good Frame (maybe 3 per year?) gets printed to 16x20 and probably framed.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Chicago, Western Suburbs
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,437
    Dear RattyMouse,

    An alternative to using drums (some have reported difficulty with processing fiber prints in drums) is to use a single tray, pouring the chemicals in and out rather than moving the print. I use four 4L pails and have printed up to 20"x24". A separate tray is needed for washing. Don't fill the tray, just use enough to cover the print with 5mm or so. Fixing is best done using two baths as the smaller volume of fluid will become exhausted quickly. Some enlargers can't go to 16"x20" but simply putting a spacer between the column and baseboard should make it possible for pretty much any enlarger.

    Good luck,

    Neal Wydra

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Shanghai, China
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,949
    Images
    38
    16 x 20 is a nice size I think. I probably would not want to go over that. I'm a bit confused by the term drum. Does that in fact mean cylinder shaped tanks? Just a guess.

  8. #8
    richard ide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Markham, Ontario
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,215
    I have done 36 x 48 in an apartment with horizontal projection. Processed the prints in the shower. A print will stick on a wet wall and process with sponges.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

  9. #9
    fotch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    SE WI- USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,128
    I have trays to do 20x24.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  10. #10
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Central florida,USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,533
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    Just curious, but how large a print can your typical home printing dark room make? I'm currently shooting 6 x 7 negatives for home printing later when I can get a dark room set up. I'm wondering how large I'll be able to make these negatives without super special equipment.

    Thanks!
    16x20" is a reasonable limit. beyond that size, you needore expensive specialty itemse.g. print washers.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin