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  1. #11
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Just guess any number for the first one. If it is too dark half the time. If too light double the time. I use little pieces about 2.5 x 2.5 cm. You can zero in on the correct time that way. As you get closer reduce your multiplier from 2 to 1.4 or 1.26. Just keep putting the new pieces in the same place on the projected image. I have done it like that for almost 30 years. The problem with the other type of test strip is that it shows different exposures for different parts of the image which is of not much benefit to me.

  2. #12

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    To the OP...Lambrecht's material is what you want to be paying attention to. Search up some of it.

  3. #13
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    CHHAHH,

    Welcome to APUG,

    I never know. I just make a test strip and if I don't see "too light" and "too dark" on that strip, I'll change something and try again.

  4. #14
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    Hi guys!
    Thanks for all the nice answers. I guess i will just do test strips...
    If i won't change paper and enlarging size, the time should be stable at least for the contact prints, right?
    For each larger print i will then do a dedicated test stip...

    Btw: This community is huge! I spend hours reading stuff last night instead of sleeping

  5. #15

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    careful how much you read ... too much, and you could easily end up thinking photography and printing are impossibly complex activities requiring intensive research, sophisticated scientific knowledge and many pieces of expensive equipment ...

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHHAHH View Post
    Hi guys!
    Thanks for all the nice answers. I guess i will just do test strips...
    If i won't change paper and enlarging size, the time should be stable at least for the contact prints, right?
    For each larger print i will then do a dedicated test stip...

    Btw: This community is huge! I spend hours reading stuff last night instead of sleeping
    test strips are your friend if you want it done right. no piece of expensiveelec tronic circuitrycan replace a good old test strip. I usually start with a 16stest strip +/-1stop in 1/3 stop increments,pick the one withe best highlightand do another one in 1/6 stop incrementsaround that.lastly do it again in 1/12 stop increments.3 sheets of 5x7"paper and I have the exposure nailed.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    CHHAHH,

    Welcome to APUG,

    I never know. I just make a test strip and if I don't see "too light" and "too dark" on that strip, I'll change something and try again.
    That's the basic idea.

    There are lots of refinements, gadgets and systems for determining print exposure, but you can, as I do, just take the low-tech and simple route. IMO it saves time and a lot of frustration.

    1: stop your enlarging lens down 2-3 stops from wide open.

    2: make a test strip. Start with a ten-second base exposure and then cover the strip in intervals. I like expanding intervals, so I use 2 seconds, 3 sec. 4 sec, 5 sec. etc. Your goal is to end up with a strip that has from approximately 10 to 30+ second strips on it.

    3: develop your test strip fully. Evaluate it. If you don't have a strip that is too light and too dark, you need to make a new test strip. Choose a different time sequence or change your lens aperture appropriately and use the same sequence you used before.

    4: repeat till you have a test strip with a too light and a too dark strip. Now, use the highlights as a guide to proper print exposure. Choose the highlight value you find correct and make a test print at that exposure.

    5: evaluate the print. If the contrast is not correct, change paper grades. This will change the print exposure time, so you need to make a new test strip at the new contrast grade.

    6: repeat the above till you get a print that has the approximate highlight and shadow values you want before beginning manipulations (dodging, burning etc.)

    Keep notes. That and experience will tell you next time what exposures you need for a test strip from a particular paper at a particular contrast grade.

    Best and good luck,

    Doremus

  8. #18

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    Here's what I did when I started out.

    10 seconds at whatever aperture and whatever size. Printed it, developed it, and looked at it. Too dark? Expose less. Too light? Expose more. It's actually that simple.

    In little while, you'll be able to guess a little better.

    If this is your very first time, I wouldn't worry about making good prints with least waste. You'll waste plenty no matter what you do....
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  9. #19
    CHHAHH's Avatar
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    Short update:

    I just did it! My first selfmade print last night! Was fun and i am feeling kind of addicted now. Yay!

    One thing puzzled me, and i think i am just not getting my head around the corner here: the test strip showed me, that a 4sec
    exposure time gave me rich blacks, nice highlights. I think it was f16.

    If i want to get a longer exposure time...let's say to do dodging and burning...i need to open the aperture more?
    Because at a camera you would close the aperture to get a longer exposure time. But with paper it works the opposite..
    Correct?!

    "Too dark? Expose less. Too light? Expose more"

  10. #20
    Rick A's Avatar
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    No, you need to stop down same as a camera. If you are already at f16, your negatives are thin, you need more exposure to the film, or more developing time, depending on results. Overall thin image but strong printing on film rebate means underexposed film. Weak image and weak printing on rebate caused by under development of film.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

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