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  1. #21

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    I keep my head raised now
    Thanks all, that sorted things out and im feeling a lot better now.
    Regards Søren

  2. #22
    arigram's Avatar
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    Like I said, if you think of representational photography, sure full tonallity all over the place will be appreciated. A viewer might want to see what's hidden under a rock or if the open door leads somewhere if the only thing you give to the audience is a representation of a pretty thing.
    Thinking of all the master and classic photoraphers I know, the photographs I love, I never, ever thought of the photograph missing anything.
    And that is what makes a work of art.

    I am not supporting bad craftmanship or bad tools.
    But let not get obssesed with it.

    In my opinion, if you are not satisfied from the image and trying to find something to hold on too, then it must be a dull image.
    I am sorry but if you only care about if there is detail in the shadows then the photographer has either failed or you are too obssesed.
    Last edited by arigram; 02-08-2005 at 09:33 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
    no digital additives and shit




  3. #23

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    I myself am not tied by the conventions saying that there must be detail in every tone from pure black to pure white, neither do I believe that the only way of composing is by placing your subject in the golden mean: I really have met people who believed that. You know some people are very persuasive and really like to get the last word, so its nice to go to APUG and get a second more nuanced oppinion from all of you, well from some of you
    BTW very wise words Aristoteles
    regards Søren

  4. #24
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    I print any damn way **I** want to. If someone else wants something different - let them print their own.

    Harsh? Maybe... but necessary, if you want your work to define your own style. Otherwise, what you will have is a diluted, de-emotionalized mixture of styles.

    Print "better"? In whose judgement (read: aesthetic) is what "better"?

    To thy own self be true. All else will follow.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  5. #25
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    I can't define pornography... um, I mean, a good print, but I know it when I see it.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  6. #26

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    LOL Neal

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Soeren
    ....The people I show my pictures often goes
    "Hmm good but its very black" or "wheress the midtones", "where's the greys"
    All I do is print what I saw, well sort of.
    So what do you guys and gals do when you decide how to print your negs.
    Especially the ones with lot of black in them.
    Regards Søren
    Hmmmm. Soeren did ask a question.

    Personally I do not follow the Technical-Perfection-Above-All-Else mantra. But I have had experience of the type of comments that Soeren mentions, and found a slight adjustment to my technical approach helped significantly.

    It is possible to make changes to the technique in order to enhance the enjoyment of the image in the viewers eyes without succumbing to the obsession to make full-tonal-range-prints-only or compromising the artistic vision.

    [size=1]but that's just my 2c (& possibly not worth that).[/size]
    Last edited by John McCallum; 02-08-2005 at 04:09 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: (sp)

  8. #28
    clay's Avatar
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    I finally snapped to the fact that when people respond with technical suggestions it can either mean

    a) they really don't like the photo and they want to say something while still being polite and inoffensive

    b) they really do think the photo is great, but acknowledging this is a little bit of challenge to their own ego, so making helpful suggestions equalizes any status or achievement gap that outright admiration might imply.

    c) they are genuinely nice people who are merely trying to help.

  9. #29

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    I wonder what it is that makes photographers and even worse non-photographers expert critiques when it come to looking at someone elses pictures? Surely when we show most people our pictures that's as far as our motives go, we're not asking for their critique so why the ....... do they think they have the right to tell us what it should look like.

    Ed and Neal beautifully put !!!

  10. #30
    rbarker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TPPhotog
    . . . so why the ....... do they think they have the right to tell us what it should look like.
    My guess is that the average person feels "empowered" to comment by the fact that they are being shown the photo. Some will express that reaction in terms of personal likes/dislikes, others will launch into full-blown critiques with art-history footnotes, often flavored with the notion that one style is better than another. The former type of comments I appreciate greatly, as individual comments add to the mental database of reactions and helps to refine/improve the "communication" element of the work. The latter type of response is often less helpful. Naturally, I still reserve the right to do it my way, nonetheless.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

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