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  1. #1

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    Is it a matter of taste ?

    When I 'm out shooting I often shoot some very dark object e.g. Dark wood or some people vearing black clothes against a dark background or nightshots.
    When printing the pics I like the black tones so I tend to not try to lighten things up but print dark. The people I show my pictures often goes
    "Hmm good but its very black" or "wheress the midtones", "where's the greys"
    All I do is print what I saw, well sort of.
    So what do you guys and gals do when you decide how to print your negs.
    Especially the ones with lot of black in them.
    Regards Søren

  2. #2

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    I like deep black, too. I normally develop my negs som the contrast is raised a bit, and then I print for the highlights to show the details I want. Then the shadows may go black...but that's what I like. Only for cute portraits I print softer.

    Morten

  3. #3

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    It depends on the picture, but if the shadows are black when I shoot them I make sure they a real black when I print them. For me the sky is black at night and that's the way I wil always print it.

  4. #4
    jovo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soeren
    The people I show my pictures often goes
    "Hmm good but its very black" or "wheress the midtones", "where's the greys"
    A print should contain exactly the tones you feel it needs to express whatever it is you want it to express, i.e. its' mood or emotion. It sounds like the folks who are commenting on your photographs are insisting that you conform to 'their' idea of what your image should be about. That said, if you're simply trying to provide a record of what you (and they) see, then you need to be certain your image is accurate in that regard. If you are 'imposing' a mood or emotion that isn't really there, then perhaps you should consider printing differently.
    John Voss

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  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by jovo
    A print should contain exactly the tones you feel it needs to express whatever it is you want it to express
    That couldn't be said more accurate, Jovo! I have a little problem with the theory of having details in all parts of the photo. If you want details all over you mostly end up with a dull sludge of grey on the paper. The eye is attracted to contrast and I find the contrasty photo more appealing than the grey photo. I need black and white in my photos, then the greys must fit in where they can
    Last edited by modafoto; 02-07-2005 at 06:55 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: I was mentioning the wrong person when i commented the quote.

  6. #6

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    Morten same here. I shoot Black and White, the Grey's are simply transitions in between in my pictures

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by jovo
    A print should contain exactly the tones you feel it needs to express whatever it is you want it to express, i.e. its' mood or emotion. It sounds like the folks who are commenting on your photographs are insisting that you conform to 'their' idea of what your image should be about. That said, if you're simply trying to provide a record of what you (and they) see, then you need to be certain your image is accurate in that regard. If you are 'imposing' a mood or emotion that isn't really there, then perhaps you should consider printing differently.
    What a relief. Thats exactly what I feel they are trying. It might be Im exaggerating a bit in my prints but not much and as you all say its the blacks and white that count the greys just fall in between.
    Regards Søren

  8. #8

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    You can print any way you want. But if a large majority of people you want as an audience are telling you the prints are too dark you need to think about what this is saying. You need to keep an open mind to move forward.

  9. #9
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    I guess it really depends on who you shoot for! If you shoot for yourself, then "to thine own self be true"! If you shoot for others, then you must kowtow to what they want.
    I have always loved having that full range. I love black blacks & white whites. High contrast is it for me. But I've been trying a little 'softer' things too...still with my blacks & whites, but a wee bit less contrast. The jury is still out on that.
    Jeanette
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    Isaiah 25:1

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChuckP
    You can print any way you want. But if a large majority of people you want as an audience are telling you the prints are too dark you need to think about what this is saying. You need to keep an open mind to move forward.
    Yep I do keep an open mind and I do listen to the ones complaining about my prints being to dark. Its not a majority but some of the "old horses in the cirkus". When looking at their prints I think they see things in a different way and perhaps they don't move or change their way of seeing. The danger is if I take to much advice from them I won't stand out from the croud, To little and I won't get all the knowledge I need to make better prints. I think it's common in photo/camera clubs that everything tends to end up looking alike like when one made some exceptional prints using greasepaper and we didn't anything else for the next year but print made using greasepaper
    Regards Søren

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