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  1. #1

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    Enlarger bulb burned after 30 min.

    I just received my Beseler Cadet II enlarger, after deciding to set-up my darkroom and finally try to print. I wanted to try how the image projects on the base-board and start to get familiar with the process. Except the lamp burned. I think I have not even had it on for 30 min. in total (not continuosly, but on and off several times, trying to see some of my negatives projected).
    Did anybody have a similar experience or have some idea what could cause that? I have a replacement lamp and I changed it. Everything seems to work fine now, but I don't think it will be feasible to change lamp after every printing session. Can I just call it bad luck or should I be worried? Maybe it's a bad sign...to remind me my negatives don't deserve to see paper...

  2. #2
    winger's Avatar
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    Most of my bulbs have lasted for years of printing sessions (2 or 3 at least and I usually got to print at least once a week). I did have one bulb blow the same session it was put in, though. I'd guess it might have been dropped before I got it or something. I tend to order them in groups of 4 or 5 to stock up in case they get the axe.
    Are you sure you had the right bulb and the right electrical "stuff"?

  3. #3
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    Some Beseler have a variable transformer that will increase voltage up it this to high it will burn out the bulb c\
    Check the voltage at the ligh bulb.

    Dave

  4. #4
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mauro35 View Post
    I just received my Beseler Cadet II enlarger, after deciding to set-up my darkroom and finally try to print. I wanted to try how the image projects on the base-board and start to get familiar with the process. Except the lamp burned. I think I have not even had it on for 30 min. in total (not continuosly, but on and off several times, trying to see some of my negatives projected).
    Did anybody have a similar experience or have some idea what could cause that? I have a replacement lamp and I changed it. Everything seems to work fine now, but I don't think it will be feasible to change lamp after every printing session. Can I just call it bad luck or should I be worried? Maybe it's a bad sign...to remind me my negatives don't deserve to see paper...
    I had 2o3 halogen bulbs burn out in a Durst L1200 in 10 yearsand I print almost every day. I keep a few at hand just in case.Please be aware that on/off is harder for a bulb than duration.Get a few spares and start printing.Amortized over a feww hundred prints, the cost for bulbs is close to nil.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #5
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mauro35 View Post
    I just received my Beseler Cadet II enlarger, after deciding to set-up my darkroom and finally try to print. I wanted to try how the image projects on the base-board and start to get familiar with the process. Except the lamp burned. I think I have not even had it on for 30 min. in total (not continuosly, but on and off several times, trying to see some of my negatives projected).
    Did anybody have a similar experience or have some idea what could cause that? I have a replacement lamp and I changed it. Everything seems to work fine now, but I don't think it will be feasible to change lamp after every printing session. Can I just call it bad luck or should I be worried? Maybe it's a bad sign...to remind me my negatives don't deserve to see paper...
    it was a sign to remind you to print before the green party outlaws enlarger bulbs
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  6. #6
    AgX
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    Non-halogen incandescant lamps for enlargers are overrated from the start. That means they last much less than household incandescant lamps.
    If then you even have higher voltage than those lamps are rated for (as your net runs on the "new" voltage standard and that lamp is still made for the old Standard) that will definitively be too much. For the exact duration in this case I would have to check tables and nomograms though.

    As said, check the voltage (in case you have a voltmeter) and the rating of the burnt lamp and report again.

  7. #7

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    I don't know what kind of bulb that particular enlarger uses. But in terms of general info, the bulb could have been weakened by the enlarger
    being bounced around during shipment. Touching a halogen bulb with bare fingers will cause them to pop. An unusually severe sudden change in temp can sometimes do it, as can an excessive voltage surge. Halogen bulbs used in typical colorhead are not affected by new light bulb regulations. I just had a halogen pop in one of my colorheads, but it's the first one in that particular unit in over a decade. The quality of bulb
    can make a huge difference. A halogen make in the US or Japan might last for years, while the generic cheapo equivalent made in China might
    pop in a week. Cheap price generally equals cheap quality. Halogens also have a specific required burn position. If it's an old screw-in opal lamp, however, you'll need an archaeologist to help you find another one. ... better modernize the head.

  8. #8

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    ... but I obviously have no idea what the bulb rules are in Finland, or what mfg sources you have there. EU made bulbs are easy to get here from specialized outlets, and I assume the reverse it true.

  9. #9
    AgX
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    Drew,
    Have you ever seen a hot halogen bulb popping after having touched before?
    All I can imagine is burning in of fatty residues. I find it hard to believe that those tiny patches could after burning to coal heat the glass excessively.
    (I guess its time for an experiment... I still got two weak car bulbs in reserve. Maybe I'll sacrifice one.)

  10. #10

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    Bulb lifetime is an average.
    Some bulbs will burn out FAST others will last a LONG time.
    It could be one of the bulbs on the FAST end of the bulb lifetime. I have had house light bulb burn out soon after installing so, it happens.
    Or if the enlarger is used, the first bulb may have been used for a LONG time before you got it, so it was on the last hour of its life.

    Hope the 2nd bulb lasts.
    Gud luk

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