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  1. #1
    jaydebruyne's Avatar
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    Negative Carrier and Glass Plate

    Hey APUG'ers,

    So I've been using my carrier with 2 black 35mm inserts. However, when I bought my enlarger, among other inserts, it did come with a piece of glass which I can use to cover the top of the negative.

    What's better to use? Plastic glass less inserts or plastic bottom/glass top? And what are the benefits, if any?

    Cheers in advance
    Jay
    I'm going to run with both hands...

  2. #2

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    A glass top will keep the neg from popping & keep it flat. The only issues are dust on the glass & Newton's Ring. You can solve the latter by using a hair dryer 1 foot from the base side of the neg (for about 10 sec}.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by chip j View Post
    A glass top will keep the neg from popping & keep it flat. The only issues are dust on the glass & Newton's Ring. You can solve the latter by using a hair dryer 1 foot from the base side of the neg (for about 10 sec}.
    Aha! Think I'll stick with the plastic inserts then

    Cheers!
    I'm going to run with both hands...

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    Adrian Twiss's Avatar
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    Plastic inserts work fine with 35mm film but I find that for medium format (in my case 6x6 and some 6x9) a glass negative carrier is almost essential to keep the negative flat. For me its also an absolute "must" for 5x4 negatives.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jaydebruyne View Post
    Hey APUG'ers,


    What's better to use? Plastic glass less inserts or plastic bottom/glass top? And what are the benefits, if any?

    Cheers in advance
    Jay
    I usually use glass on top. See if your glass looks slightly frostet.
    Last edited by miha; 01-28-2014 at 02:49 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6
    jaydebruyne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miha View Post
    I usually use glass on top. See if your glass looks slightly frostet.
    What does it mean if it's frosted?
    I'm going to run with both hands...

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    Quote Originally Posted by jaydebruyne View Post
    What does it mean if it's frosted?
    It means it prevents the formation of Newton's rings; It's a good thing.

  8. #8
    jaydebruyne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miha View Post
    It means it prevents the formation of Newton's rings; It's a good thing.
    Ah ok, I will have a look. Cheers for the info.
    I'm going to run with both hands...

  9. #9

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    I'm curious what enlarger you are using where the neg-carrier is plastic?!

    The neg usually curves slightly in a plain carrier, so that the middle of the negative is higher than the edges (which are held in the carrier). The top glass should be able to stop the bulge and keep the negative flat, though a double-glass carrier is better still for flatness and becomes significantly more important with larger formats. When the neg is not flat you will have some difficulty focussing both the middle and the corners at the same time plus the amount of curve of the negative may even change during the exposure -- definitely not helpful.

    One occasionally seen problem is the appearance of Newtons Rings between the negative and the glass surface. These can be eliminated by one surface having a very, very, very slightly rough surface -- hence "anti Newton-ring" (ANR) glass in negative carriers. It appears to be slightly grey looking but this does not affect the image, as the glass is above the film. If you use a lower glass too, as in a double-glass carrier, the tiny roughness of the emulsion is usually enough to prevent the ring effect.

    If you can get to Photofusion hire-darkroom and training centre, in Brixton, they will be able to show you the differences in the various neg-carrier designs as well as giving all sorts of other advice to "hit the ground running" with your printing. Have fun!

  10. #10
    jaydebruyne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinP View Post
    I'm curious what enlarger you are using where the neg-carrier is plastic?!

    The neg usually curves slightly in a plain carrier, so that the middle of the negative is higher than the edges (which are held in the carrier). The top glass should be able to stop the bulge and keep the negative flat, though a double-glass carrier is better still for flatness and becomes significantly more important with larger formats. When the neg is not flat you will have some difficulty focussing both the middle and the corners at the same time plus the amount of curve of the negative may even change during the exposure -- definitely not helpful.

    One occasionally seen problem is the appearance of Newtons Rings between the negative and the glass surface. These can be eliminated by one surface having a very, very, very slightly rough surface -- hence "anti Newton-ring" (ANR) glass in negative carriers. It appears to be slightly grey looking but this does not affect the image, as the glass is above the film. If you use a lower glass too, as in a double-glass carrier, the tiny roughness of the emulsion is usually enough to prevent the ring effect.

    If you can get to Photofusion hire-darkroom and training centre, in Brixton, they will be able to show you the differences in the various neg-carrier designs as well as giving all sorts of other advice to "hit the ground running" with your printing. Have fun!
    My carrier is metal, the inserts are plastic. I use a Kaiser VCP6001.

    Thanks for the info will have a look at the glass and try it out next time I print!

    Regarding training, it's a luxury I can't afford right now, maybe in the future though, but thanks for the info of the centre.
    I'm going to run with both hands...

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