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  1. #21
    jaydebruyne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul_c5x4 View Post
    I usually dump developer at the end of a session unless I know I'm going to printing again the next day. As for stop, it doesn't get much cheaper than citric acid A teaspoon per litre of water is sufficient.
    Do you have a link to this? I'd like to look into it. And it's as good as any branded stop solution?
    I'm going to run with both hands...

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinP View Post
    As a temporary source of ventilation (for a temporary spare-bedroom . . . errrm . . . I mean darkroom) I put a big column-mounted electric-fan inside the 'darkroom' and pointing at the open doorway every time I went out to take a print to the washer. It isn't ideal obviously, but it made a noticeable difference - helped by having to open the door so often of course. Optimistically, I hoped that blowing air out of the room would create a less vigorous dust-circulation than blowing air inwards from the corridor.
    Oooh I have a fan!!!

    Ok, another question. At the moment I'm washing prints in a bucket of water. Dipping it in and out and soaking it in between. Makes it easier for me and I don't have to walk through my cat and dog hair-filled hallway, through the kitchen.

    Any issues with bucket washing?
    I'm going to run with both hands...

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaydebruyne View Post
    Do you have a link to this? I'd like to look into it. And it's as good as any branded stop solution?

    No links, although the use of citric acid as a stop has been discussed on APUG quite a few times.
    Is it as good as a branded solution - Somewhat subjective. Plain citric acid stop bath lacks the indicator dye used by the likes of Kodak, and it also lacks any buffering agents. On the plus side, it is dirt cheap, especially if you buy citric acid in bulk.

  4. #24

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    Citric acid as a stop is good, some people just use water.

  5. #25
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    jaydebruyne,

    If you didn't blow the dust off neg between prints, then the specks or hair were probably on the paper when you had the enlarger light on. Doesn't matter in the developer after that, you can scatter all the dust you want at that point. Sometimes there are specks caused by stop bath being so strong they cause effervescence but doesn't sound like that to me in your case.

    I for one, would rather have a white speck to spot on the print... than a black spot (caused by dust on the film before the light hits it in the camera). That's harder to retouch.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaydebruyne View Post
    Do you have a link to this? I'd like to look into it. And it's as good as any branded stop solution?
    Stop bath is pretty flexible.

    You can even use diluted white vinegar - it just usually ends up being more expensive than concentrated stop bath.

    And vinegar and citric acid don't have any "indicator" in them to give you an indication that the stop bath is getting tired.

    You can tell your citric acid/diluted vinegar/stop bath is near exhaustion when the prints feel slippery.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #27
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    I put the prints in the developer face down and gently push them under with my gloved fingers. I use tongs for test strips and prints I know won't be final. Much less likely to damage prints by hands. I use nitrile gloves and wash them after each print, like I was washing my hands. Then dry them before taking them off. That last for many printing sessions, so there's little cost.

    Some developers keep better than others. I've been reusing and replenishing the same batch of Ansco 130 for over a year now. It still develops quickly with excellent DMax. I use water for a stop bath and a neutral fixer. All of this is odorless and causes no discomfort in the darkroom. I don't usually run the fan with this chemistry. I would if I was using an acetic acid stop bath, or an acid based fixer. I'm sure someone will say I should use the fan anyway, but I'm not convinced.

    I wouldn't run a table type fan while printing. It's a sure way to add more dust to the paper than it looks like you already have. It also helps to keep the cats and dogs out of the room and vacuum frequently (ideally with the exhaust of the vacuum outside the darkroom).

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by jaydebruyne View Post
    Anyway, I digress. So at times I notice white dots or hair like marks on my prints, and then they disappear on the next print of the same negative.

    Ruling out the negative as the blemish is sporadic, is this debris on the paper or???
    I'd say it's on the paper, as several others have noted.

    If you wanted to do a conclusive test, and don't mind wasting a sheet of paper, you could dial the enlarging lens out-of-focus, then make a print. If you still get the white specks, you know that they can't possibly be dust on the negative ('cuz it would be too far out-of-focus).

    I don't know your printing conditions, but if there is any open woodwork or the like above your enlarger, you might try taping a sheet of plastic dropcloth to the ceiling over the enlarger. This would stop debris from falling straight down.

  9. #29
    jaydebruyne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul_c5x4 View Post
    No links, although the use of citric acid as a stop has been discussed on APUG quite a few times.
    Is it as good as a branded solution - Somewhat subjective. Plain citric acid stop bath lacks the indicator dye used by the likes of Kodak, and it also lacks any buffering agents. On the plus side, it is dirt cheap, especially if you buy citric acid in bulk.
    Is buffering agent a must have?

    So, I can buy any citric acid say from freeBay, tea spoon (heaped? Level? Does it matter?) of the powder in 1ltr of water?

    I can get 1kg for £5 which would last me ages, rather than ilfostop which at 50ml a session would last me 10 sessions in the darkroom and double the cost.
    I'm going to run with both hands...

  10. #30
    jaydebruyne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    jaydebruyne,

    If you didn't blow the dust off neg between prints, then the specks or hair were probably on the paper when you had the enlarger light on. Doesn't matter in the developer after that, you can scatter all the dust you want at that point. Sometimes there are specks caused by stop bath being so strong they cause effervescence but doesn't sound like that to me in your case.

    I for one, would rather have a white speck to spot on the print... than a black spot (caused by dust on the film before the light hits it in the camera). That's harder to retouch.
    I'm convinced it's on the paper so. I'm also convinced it's coming from my home made light tight bag!! After I've finished my box of paper I'll use the bag from that instead as it's cleaner.

    Retouching. Whoa! I'm just getting used to dodging/burning and exposing haha I'll give that a try at a later date!

    I really want to share some of my prints but my scanner is so crap it renders the prints awfully. And you never get a good reproduction with a photo
    I'm going to run with both hands...

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