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  1. #31
    jaydebruyne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Stop bath is pretty flexible.

    You can even use diluted white vinegar - it just usually ends up being more expensive than concentrated stop bath.

    And vinegar and citric acid don't have any "indicator" in them to give you an indication that the stop bath is getting tired.

    You can tell your citric acid/diluted vinegar/stop bath is near exhaustion when the prints feel slippery.
    I'm def going to go the citric acid route and I'll probably discard after every session as it's so cheap. I generally never print more than say 15 5x7 prints in a session (due to burning dodging errors) so I'm assuming one batch of citric will handle this?
    I'm going to run with both hands...

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaydebruyne View Post
    Is buffering agent a must have?

    So, I can buy any citric acid say from freeBay, tea spoon (heaped? Level? Does it matter?) of the powder in 1ltr of water?

    I can get 1kg for £5 which would last me ages,
    A buffering agent is not a "must have" - It is only a stop bath...

    A heaped teaspoon is sufficient, not that it really matters that much.

    I purchased a tub from Bonneymans (along with a bunch of other stuff) - Doesn't really matter if it comes from an ebay seller or a major chemical supplier.

    The main point of the exercise is to have fun without spending more than you really need to.

  3. #33
    jaydebruyne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul_c5x4 View Post
    The main point of the exercise is to have fun without spending more than you really need to.
    Absolutely!! Cheers for the info
    I'm going to run with both hands...

  4. #34
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    Clean Air

    Of all the things I've read on this thread, the one that catches my eye the most is 18 hours in a darkroom with less-than-optimal ventilation. At the very least,open the door and let some fresh air come into the room very 1/2 hour or so. If you can place a fan by the door that brings in fresh air from the other rooms while the door is open, even better.

    I use stop bath until it can "give" no more …. I use it and re-use and re-use it and re-use it. And, when I'm running low, I mix 1/2 the recommend concentration and keep using and re-using. And, when I'm totally out, I simply use fresh water (several changes). As for developer, if I'm developing just a few prints (less than 10), I put the used/old developer in a bottle and re-use it and re-use it. I only use fresh developer when I know I am close to the final print (the last iteration or two). No need to waste fresh developer when you're still figuring out your dodging/burning scheme, I don't think.

    I have tried both ways: emulsion up and emulsion down. Never had an issue with emulsion up, so I place my paper emulsion up on the developer - never a problem.

    Hope this helps.
    Jack Rosa

  5. #35
    jaydebruyne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JackRosa View Post
    Of all the things I've read on this thread, the one that catches my eye the most is 18 hours in a darkroom with less-than-optimal ventilation. At the very least,open the door and let some fresh air come into the room very 1/2 hour or so. If you can place a fan by the door that brings in fresh air from the other rooms while the door is open, even better.

    I use stop bath until it can "give" no more …. I use it and re-use and re-use it and re-use it. And, when I'm running low, I mix 1/2 the recommend concentration and keep using and re-using. And, when I'm totally out, I simply use fresh water (several changes). As for developer, if I'm developing just a few prints (less than 10), I put the used/old developer in a bottle and re-use it and re-use it. I only use fresh developer when I know I am close to the final print (the last iteration or two). No need to waste fresh developer when you're still figuring out your dodging/burning scheme, I don't think.

    I have tried both ways: emulsion up and emulsion down. Never had an issue with emulsion up, so I place my paper emulsion up on the developer - never a problem.

    Hope this helps.
    I left the darkroom every hour or so.. I'm still alive

    Interesting that you max out your chems. Think I will do just that while I'm getting used to burning/dodging.

    Thanks Jack
    I'm going to run with both hands...

  6. #36

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    Oh yes, i used to stretch my developer until if would die. That meant 3-4 reuses and up to 2 weeks wthout problems.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaydebruyne View Post
    I left the darkroom every hour or so.. I'm still alive

    Interesting that you max out your chems. Think I will do just that while I'm getting used to burning/dodging.

    Thanks Jack
    Jay: one other idea that could prove beneficial to you: When you think your developer has had it, don't throw it our but keep it in a bottle labeled "OLD" or "FIRST" and use this old/almost exhausted liquid to be the first thing your paper sees. After 1/2 minute or so, transfer the sheet to fresh developer (or use method described below).

    Same with the fixer - use the 2-bath fixing method: the print first goes into a tray with old/quasi-exhausted fixer, then you transfer the print to the fresh fixer. Your chemicals will last you much, much longer. It adds to the process (and potentially the time), but if money is not unlimited for you, you will greatly benefit from the savings. I'd rather use the $$ to buy new toys that on chemicals, especially when these chemicals are used on test prints that are going to be discarded anyway.

    Rather than adding trays, I simply empty the old developer (into a jug) and pour the fresh developed in the tray. I do the same with the 2-batch fixing ~ rather than using 2 trays, I empty the old fixer into a jug and pour fresh fixed into the same tray. Two additional jugs is more space efficient than 2 additional trays.

    No need for fancy jugs/container either. For the old developer and fixer, any container you were going to discard would do (milk, large soda containers, etc.) Who cares how airtight they are anyway?

    If you are using TF-4 fixer (my favorite!), no need to use an acid stop bath between developer and fixer; just plain water - this applies especially to those "test" prints while you are figuring out your dodge/burn sequence and times. Once you feel you are very close to the final print, you may want to use the acid stop bath. When I do use a stop bath, I always use a weaker concentration than the one specified in the acid bath's instructions. IMO, too little acid is better than too much acid.

    Hope this helps
    Jack Rosa

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