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  1. #11

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    You could also invest in a set of IR goggles - that way you can watch the entire development process. They will also come in handy for loading and unloading film holders.

  2. #12
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    I would like to add that not only is the eye most sensitive to green light but that many films have a dip in sensitivity in this region. Even so it is very important not to expose the film to the light until development is at least 50% completed. The self masking of the developed silver is an added safety factor.

    The film should be inspected from the base side and not from the emulsion side. This technique takes a bit of experience to do well. The standard time/temperature method is actually more accurate in most circumstances.

    A film can also be put in a pre-bath containing certain dyes to decrease the sensitivity of thee film allowing the use of a much brighter light.
    This is all correct and I would like to add that before and during the initial development with the panchromatic film covered in total darkness, you let your eyes adjust for about 20 minutes to this very dark green light before inspection.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    This is all correct and I would like to add that before and during the initial development with the panchromatic film covered in total darkness, you let your eyes adjust for about 20 minutes to this very dark green light before inspection.
    Yes, good point it is very important that one's eyes become adapted to the dark before starting. The light from the safelight is very dim.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

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  4. #14
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Actually Gerald, one point I would dispute in your post is inspection from the base side. I understand the reason behind this, but does this give you enough information to judge development? I would suggest a brief inspection of the emulsion side may be a better option.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  5. #15

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    Green light and inspection

    Ah, I stand corrected. I knew somebody with more know how would step in and correct me if I was wrong...

    Very cool about inspection via safelight! I had no idea!

  6. #16
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    I shoot Fuji HRT green sensitive x-ray, orthochromatic film and I process it under a red safelight. I still haven't mastered it. For me, time and temperature has works for me.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  7. #17
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    I learned the hard way that examining the emulsion side and terminating development will give you thin negatives. Possibly with thin tabular grain emulsions the difference would be less.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

  8. #18
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by richard ide View Post
    I learned the hard way that examining the emulsion side and terminating development will give you thin negatives. Possibly with thin tabular grain emulsions the difference would be less.
    Haaa, You are right - thin negatives. No there's no difference between types of films. I develop by infrared viewer and the emulsion comes up quickly and you are so right that if you don't flip it over and look at the base, you will be tempted to pull the film. TMY-2 is no different than any other film (though X-Ray film may be a different story - isn't it 2-sided emulsion?)

    (I develop to time and temperature, but with the aid of infrared viewer because it's as much fun as developing prints when you can watch it develop.)

  9. #19
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    I think part of the reason develop by inspection by dim green light late in the process "works" is... Yes you are exposing the film a little... but you aren't developing it that much longer. So the grains you exposed "to the point of being developable" with the green light, aren't developed for very long.

  10. #20

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    Bill, also note depending on the film and developer formula, the development process itself has a desensitizing effect. This helps with DBI too.

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