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  1. #1

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    Dual or split contrast filter application use

    Can anyone provide me with information, experiences,discussions, resources... with utilizing split filtering on black and white print enlargements?

  2. #2
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  3. #3

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    Thanks

    Thanks for the resource. I like the accompanying youtube demos.

  4. #4
    jimjm's Avatar
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    Check out this tutorial posted on the Online Darkroom about split-grade printing. Very well thought-out and easy to understand.
    http://www.theonlinedarkroom.com/201...uest-post.html

  5. #5
    David Brown's Avatar
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    And:

    http://www.lesmcleanphotography.com/...ull&article=21

    There are those that will argue that there is nothing you can do with split grade that can't be done with a single exposure at a single grade filtration. And, for the most part, that's true. However, it is a valuable technique that many fine printers (such as McLean) have made use of. I use it when a negative is just a puzzle to me. Fortunately, most of my negatives aren't puzzling. Still, I appreciate having been taught this method by Les some years ago.

    It just so happens that I returned only an hour ago from a local theater supply house where I bought a blue and a green Lee gel to use for this very purpose. I've always used the yellow and magenta filters, but many use blue and green filters. I'll do this with a condenser head and see how it goes.

  6. #6
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimjm View Post
    Check out this tutorial posted on the Online Darkroom about split-grade printing. Very well thought-out and easy to understand.
    http://www.theonlinedarkroom.com/201...uest-post.html
    I've also seen another tutorial that works a bit differently to this one, in that once the first grade time is found, the second test strip is printed *on top* of the first one, rather than two separate strips from scratch.
    edit:
    Quote Originally Posted by David Brown View Post
    http://www.lesmcleanphotography.com/articles.php?page=full&article=21
    that's the one.
    Anyone have any opinions as to which method is better?


    Also, I've read enough about it to understand the whole what and the how (and the why). My biggest question is the when? Does it work best on landscapes, still-life, people? When I've got a low-contrast neg or a high contrast, a dense neg or a thin one? Or just all the time?
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

    f/64 and be there.

  7. #7
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Croubie View Post
    I've also seen another tutorial that works a bit differently to this one, in that once the first grade time is found, the second test strip is printed *on top* of the first one, rather than two separate strips from scratch.

    Anyone have any opinions as to which method is better?
    I do the hard on top of the soft approach. That's the one I was taught.


    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Croubie View Post
    Also, I've read enough about it to understand the whole what and the how (and the why). My biggest question is the when? Does it work best on landscapes, still-life, people? When I've got a low-contrast neg or a high contrast, a dense neg or a thin one? Or just all the time?
    Some printers use it all the time - it's just their way of working. Like I said, I use it when a negative does not give up its needed contrast easily.

  8. #8
    David Brown's Avatar
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    The other variation is to use different filtration for just dodging and burning, after a base exposure at grade X.

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    Thank you!

    Thanks for all the replies- opinions, resources, field discussions...we shall begin tomorrow.

  10. #10

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    Thank you!

    Thanks for all the replies- opinions, resources, field discussions...we shall begin tomorrow.

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