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  1. #11

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    My V54 lamphouse is equipped with a compensating timer, so exposures are consistent regardless. There is also a typical heater, which I can
    turn on about half an hour ahead of time on colder days. I don't have any set rules about how I split print. All kinds of options work, and I do
    them instinctively by now. If I wrote a book about it, I might mention a few accessories, but otherwise would sum it up in about one line:
    "just do it".

  2. #12
    Steve Sherman's Avatar
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    I have read and heard all the arguments for which comes first and can only reason that the soft exposure (green bright light) breaks the threshold of the paper virtually instantly where as the hard contrast light is much dimmer, as least to the eye and therefore may not equally break the threshold of the paper as quickly.
    For the above reasons I prefer to expose the soft contrast light first and hard contrast second, more importantly I think it most important that one settles on one or the other and does it in that order each time with the emphasis on consistency.
    Cheers !
    Real Photographs are Born Wet !
    http://www.steve-sherman.com

  3. #13
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Sherman View Post
    I think it most important that one settles on one or the other and does it in that order each time with the emphasis on consistency.
    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    "just do it".
    Yep!

  4. #14

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    It's impossible to make a straightjacket set of rules, because different VC papers tend to respond somewhat differently. And when you're done
    with exposure per se, the manner in which the prints accept specific toners will also be affected by the relative exposure to different aspects of the emulsion. I have zero problem switching from cold light to additive colorhead to subtractive colorhead, and doing all kinds of things which
    might include full split-print control or only selective control by hard filtration. All it takes is a few test strips and a bit of experience with your chosen papers, developers, toners etc. Reading a four hundred page book about it would tell you less than just watching someone do it for half an hour. The most important asset you can have on hand is a good "fun coefficient". It seems to work every time.

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