Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,927   Posts: 1,585,160   Online: 839
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Lincoln County, NM
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    35

    another split grade question

    I learned split grade printing from Les McClean and I'm a bit confused. Does it make a difference which grade you expose for first? Iknow it's suppose to be soft then hard but does it make any difference?
    charlie

  2. #2
    David Brown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    near Dallas, TX USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,345
    Images
    8
    If you learned from Les, than you learned to do the soft exposure first.

    http://www.lesmcleanphotography.com/...ull&article=21

    PS: it's McLean ...

  3. #3
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Brooklyn, N.Y. USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,462
    Images
    47
    I learned from Les as well and it's as David said. But I also think in the long run it really doesn't matter.

  4. #4
    brian steinberger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    2,351
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    100
    I think the argument for doing the soft exposure first is that the hard exposure then does not affect the highlights very much. As opposed to doing the hard exposure first the next exposure with the soft grade will make your blacks blacker. I found this to be mostly true. Each negative is unique though and I base my decision on which grade to use first based on the negative. If you do the hard exposure first try exposing for 1/3 stop less than the strip that gives you first sign of black. Then the next soft filter exposure will bring them down to where you want them.

  5. #5
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,953
    Images
    60
    I usually start with the soft exposure, but if I am printing something like a high key portrait or a scene in fog, it works better to start with the high contrast first.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    São Paulo, Brazil
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    13
    In Lambrecht, Woodhouse Way Beyond Monochrome 2e they put the curves of soft/hard and hard/soft exposures, the conclusion is, quoted from the book:

    Indeed as you might expect, the contrast/exposure graph is
    identical to that in fig.6, dispelling the myth that the
    order of exposures makes a visible difference.
    They have a lot more to tell about split grade, so is a good ideia to get a copy of the book.

  7. #7
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,390
    Quote Originally Posted by NewMexican View Post
    does it make any difference?
    If you are printing with a large coldlight head, the temperature and light intensity of the second exposure are altered by the first exposure. There are a lot of ways to work around this problem (compensating timers, heaters, stabilizers, below the lens shutter, etc) One simple solution is to always do the same color first in the exposure sequence.

  8. #8
    Blighty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lancaster, N.W. England
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    878
    Images
    69
    It all depends on the contrast of the neg. If it's a contrasty/normal neg then I find soft exposure first is the best way to go. If it's a soft neg, better to determine the blacks first.
    Norman is an island.Time and tide wait for Norman.

  9. #9
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,381
    Images
    4
    The order of exposure makes no difference whatsoever when making the final print.

    When making test strips it is best to determine the dominant exposure first.

    For low contrast negatives (making a high contrast print) first determine the high contrast (magenta) exposure for the desired shadows, then find the right exposure for the highlights with the low contrast filter.

    Conversely, for high contrast negatives (low contrast print) first determine the low contrast (yellow) exposure for the highlights, then move on to the shadows.

    The reason for this is that the dominant exposure will have an effect on the other end of the tonal scale: A long high contrast/shadows (magenta) exposure will have some effect on the highlights, but the short low contrast/highlights (yellow) exposure will have no effect on the shadows; A long low contrast (yellow) exposure will have some effect on the shadows but the shorter shadow (magenta) exposure won't effect the highlights.

    Experienced photographers often find themselves making lower contrast negatives (slightly overexposed and underdeveloped) and higher contrast prints. Generous film exposure is always a good idea. But, just as importantly, is the increase in linearity of the HD curve at higher contrast grades. Low contrast MG filtration invariably has flat spots in the curve, leading to poor detail in certain tones. If you print at -1 or 0 then you will find that detail disappears in the middle/dark greys - there is just a pool of fog where detail should be.

    For more information on this see the Darkroom Automation application note:
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/su...vcworkings.pdf

    As for cold-light heads, well, they are just a can of worms when it comes to this issue. To keep prints consistent it is best to keep the head on all the time - only turn it off for loading the paper and while the paper is in the developer. This keeps the lamp hot (so much for 'cold' light ... of course, if you kept an incandescent head on all the time there would be a distinct smell of burning insulation after a while). Incandescent heads have a slight drift as they warm up - light output increases by about 0.05 stops over a period of a few minutes.
    Last edited by Nicholas Lindan; 02-11-2014 at 02:44 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,066
    First off for me, what ic-racer said re cold light heads (I use the Arristo V54 lamp).
    Also, since the hard filter doesn't affect the highlights as much as the reverse (if at all) I use the soft filter first to nail highlights. And, if there isn't adequate separation in the highlights themselves, I may not use the softest filter for them.
    When the highlights are established, I test for the deepest values, again adjusting time and filter choice. Varying the time for the hardest filter (which I try first, with the soft filter exposure already made) controls how far up into the shadow range the full black value goes. Sometimes I choose one or two filters down from the hardest, for the hard exposure, just to control this separation in the ranges below Z5.
    Am I explaining myself?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin