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  1. #11
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Paper sizes originally made to correspond to negative sizes for contact printing, not just for 4x5 but 8x10 and 11x14 as well as other sizes.
    Rick A
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  2. #12

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    It works both ways, since film formats like 6x7 and 645 were basically reformatted to fit common paper proportions (downsized from things like
    6x9 and 6x6). In America, the two most standard film sizes have long been 4x5 and 8x10, with 5x7 being less common. Photofinishers who
    cranked out a lot of small amateur 35mm prints obviously used narrow rolls of paper which the machine cut off to length at the correct shape.
    I tend to work within the visual proportions of whatever camera format, though not exclusively. Usually minor cropping only. Since I mostly
    shoot 4x5 and 8x10, standard paper sizes are convenient. When I'm printing 35mm, I tend to make small prints, so the dollar waste of unexposed paper is not a significant factor for me.

  3. #13
    Chris Lange's Avatar
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    Never seen the logic of cropping to accommodate the paper's aspect ratio/size if the negative isn't in the same ratio, especially for square negs. I also shoot to the respective format, and can't visualize crops in the viewfinder. If I do crop, I maintain the ratio, and it's usually very minor... just to straighten up a horizon or vertical, or to nail the symmetry exactly.
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  4. #14
    Regular Rod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_S View Post
    ,,,
    Why this obsession with full frame?
    Personally, the framing is determined by the camera I choose at the time. The "crop" is made when the exposure is made. From then on I want it all and don't want to cut any of it off. To accommodate the image I just print on a bigger sheet of paper and then matte it to the image.

    RR

  5. #15
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    I recall a couple of decades back a number of photo store chains offered 8x12 inch color prints which were nice for 35mm. Getting frames the right proportion for them was sometimes a little challenging unless one went with custom or sectional pairs. Doing my own B&W prints I'm willing to waste a little paper to print the whole negative, whatever format that happens to be.

  6. #16
    ROL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Regular Rod View Post
    Personally, the framing is determined by the camera I choose at the time. The "crop" is made when the exposure is made. From then on I want it all and don't want to cut any of it off. To accommodate the image I just print on a bigger sheet of paper and then matte it to the image.

    RR
    So the tool dictates your "artistic" experience. How evolved. You must carry a lot of different tools with you to accommodate visions other than by a single manufacturer, if you have them.

    The beauty of the DR, enlarger, and easel is that you can make decisions such as cropping all by your little lonesome, without anyone's interference.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_S View Post
    ...Why this obsession with full frame?
    I'd dare say that there are many Henri Cartier Bresson fans out there who are obsessed with it, hence the filed negative carriers. The image has to have this rather irregular thin black border, in order to show that no cropping was done to the original image and they print whatever they saw in the viewfinder. I find it a self imposed severe restriction that I'll never understand. There are so many times that the 3:2 aspect ratio of a 135 negative is far from ideal for the scene I photograph and I'll crop to my heart's content. There were times where a square negative was all that was needed, so I chopped a third of the image, because it was weakening the composition. So, why disregard the endless possibilities that cropping can give? By the way, I'm not suggesting sloppy composition. I try to compose the best that I can, but I refuse to let my camera's aspect ratio impose any limitations on me.

  8. #18
    fotch's Avatar
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    Cropping takes place when making the final print. If shooting slide film, then the camera does the cropping, although by making a copy slide, further cropping can take place. Artist crop when they choose what to include in the painting. In that way, making the negative may have more info than is wanted in the final result, hence it is cropped, similar to a painter. JMHO
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  9. #19
    Regular Rod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ROL View Post
    So the tool dictates your "artistic" experience. How evolved. You must carry a lot of different tools with you to accommodate visions other than by a single manufacturer, if you have them.

    The beauty of the DR, enlarger, and easel is that you can make decisions such as cropping all by your little lonesome, without anyone's interference.
    No, I dictate by making the choice of the tool. I may make the choice at home when I choose the bag of stuff I'm taking with me. Or I may choose to take a selection of tools with me, in which case I decide in front of the subject and then make my choice. No one interferes with me at any stage as I work alone (apart from the dog who often comes along). I like to use all the space available to me and not cut bits off later when making the final print. It's how I work right now, that's all. It has no greater or lesser merit than anyone else's preferences.

    RR
    Last edited by Regular Rod; 03-06-2014 at 05:32 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anon Ymous View Post
    I'd dare say that there are many Henri Cartier Bresson fans out there who are obsessed with it, hence the filed negative carriers. The image has to have this rather irregular thin black border, in order to show that no cropping was done to the original image and they print whatever they saw in the viewfinder. I find it a self imposed severe restriction that I'll never understand. There are so many times that the 3:2 aspect ratio of a 135 negative is far from ideal for the scene I photograph and I'll crop to my heart's content. There were times where a square negative was all that was needed, so I chopped a third of the image, because it was weakening the composition. So, why disregard the endless possibilities that cropping can give? By the way, I'm not suggesting sloppy composition. I try to compose the best that I can, but I refuse to let my camera's aspect ratio impose any limitations on me.
    I probably can't explain it in a way that you would understand, and I'm OK with that. But I have to have the irregular thin black border to satisfy an irrational desire to see all there is to see. It's more like an addiction than a desirable standard. My favorite advice to those who don't like or need to see the whole frame is "save yourself, it's too late for me"...

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