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  1. #11

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    It shouldn't be difficult. You have a safelight, right?

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    It shouldn't be difficult. You have a safelight, right?
    I do. I don't always use it though. I guess I could cover the easel with black paper/cloth and then aim the safelight at the enlarger head where I'd have to slide the filter holder into its little slot. After struggling to get the filter into the cheapy holder. My only complaint with my Beseler 67 is its lousy filter holder.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hatchetman View Post
    I do. I don't always use it though. I guess I could cover the easel with black paper/cloth and then aim the safelight at the enlarger head where I'd have to slide the filter holder into its little slot. After struggling to get the filter into the cheapy holder. My only complaint with my Beseler 67 is its lousy filter holder.
    The below the lens Ilford and Kodak filters worked great with the condenser head on my Beseler 67C.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    The below the lens Ilford and Kodak filters worked great with the condenser head on my Beseler 67C.
    Yes, you are probably right. I got the Ilford set with the enlarger. I'll see if I can get a vintage Kodak set on the cheap. Good idea.

  5. #15

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    With split printing all you need are two filters. You just buy optical (taking-quality) glass filters, one deep green, the other deep blue, which
    can be used below the lens. Life is simple. Even simpler is to use a conventional colorhead which can have the filtration reset in the dark. Then
    you can do either true split printing or ordinary variable contrast work. I gave up even bothering with so-called grade numbers long ago. Split
    printing is far easier to do than to explain. But not all VC papers are the same. With some you need at least a token amount of exposure of both
    emulsions in order to obtain a good DMax.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by splash_fr View Post
    and I'll stay at basic printing for a while and try to get overall brightness an contrast right.
    When doing this, you still need to get the highlights right and if your image has one particular area that those highlights are present, the the issue you highlighted earlier about getting sensible infomation from the test strip still exists. This is when you 'need' a test strip printer that moves the paper under that one spot, rather than you running the test strip across the image. Ralph Lambrect has plans for a fancy one (I had a quick search but I can't find the link). I made a simple one (out of matt board) which works fine. I've attached a pdf of how I made it (which I thought I'd uploaded here but can't find!)
    Attached Files

  7. #17

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    Ralph Lambrecht's test strip printer:
    http://www.waybeyondmonochrome.com/W...PrinterEd2.pdf

    I made one from MDB material (from my scrap pile), and it works great.
    Last edited by silveror0; 03-26-2014 at 12:10 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18
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    I do agree that it is important to get some experience with "standard" printing, but I think learning about split grade printing is good for beginners, because of one particular consequence of split grade printing.

    I find that if you understand how the two (or three) different emulsions in variable contrast papers respond to the filters, you will be a better printer. And split grade printing forces you to think about that.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #19

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    I'm very much the tyro printer, but I really don't think the very conservative approach to learning so often advocated works for everyone, and certainly not me.

    I had a negative I was struggling to print the other week, and couldn't make it "pop" in the way I envisaged it needed to. So just to try something new and refresh myself, I tried split-grade a la Les McLean.

    The very first test print was almost perfect. It's not a "master print" by any stretch of the imagination but it is enough to have a couple of copies around to remind me that I can produce something worth looking at.

    Does this mean I'll now never learn the basics properly or will split-grade print everything? Of course not.

    When learning, many people need to have something ahead to spark their interest. There are of course plenty of people for who being methodical and thorough and doing one thing at a time until they have it perfected before moving on works very well (I'd guess many or even most people at APUG might fall in this category), but it is not a universally-applicable learning method.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    I do agree that it is important to get some experience with "standard" printing, but I think learning about split grade printing is good for beginners, because of one particular consequence of split grade printing.

    I find that if you understand how the two (or three) different emulsions in variable contrast papers respond to the filters, you will be a better printer. And split grade printing forces you to think about that.
    I disagree. I think people need to learn the basics about how variable contrast papers "see" filtered light before splitting their base exposure into a hard and soft. Otherwise they're just guessing at a more complex gimmick. The confusion in virtually every "split-grade" thread posted by inexperienced printers is evidence of this. Ilford has a very good on-line publication about filtration and contrast control with variable contrast papers. It is also worth reminding everyone "split-grade" is nothing more than a specific case of multiple grade or variable contrast printing.

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